Sir Francis Hastings and the religious education of James VI and I

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/107314
Title:
Sir Francis Hastings and the religious education of James VI and I
Authors:
Newton, D. (Diana)
Affiliation:
University of Teesside. Department of Sociology.
Citation:
Newton, D. (1998) 'Sir Francis Hastings and the religious education of James VI and I', The Historical Journal, 41 (4), pp.917-934.
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press
Journal:
The Historical Journal
Issue Date:
Dec-1998
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/107314
DOI:
10.1017/S0018246X98007924
Additional Links:
http://www.journals.cambridge.org/abstract_S0018246X98007924
Abstract:
This article contends that the confrontation between Sir Francis Hastings and the new king of England, in the winter of 1604–5, was of far more lasting significance in determining King James's religious policy than the Hampton Court Conference, which had left many grievances of the most dogmatic and zealous Calvinists largely unresolved. The showdown was prompted by James's apparent leniency towards Catholicism and his role in the peace process with Spain. James emerged from the encounter as a king of real political ability who turned the episode to his advantage; using the opportunity to ‘tackle’ the Catholic threat and ‘subdue’ the nonconforming puritan ministers whilst also endeavouring to energize local government. Thereafter, he was able to defuse religious friction for much of the rest of his reign.
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Keywords:
Hastings, Francis; James VI; religious policy; Catholicism; peace; Spain
ISSN:
0018-246X
Rights:
Subject to restrictions, author can archive publisher's version/PDF. For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ [Accessed 07/07/2010]
Citation Count:
0 [Scopus and Web of Science, 07/07/2010]

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorNewton, D. (Diana)en
dc.date.accessioned2010-07-07T07:47:56Zen
dc.date.available2010-07-07T07:47:56Zen
dc.date.issued1998-12en
dc.identifier.citationThe Historical Journal; 41(4):917-934en
dc.identifier.issn0018-246Xen
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/S0018246X98007924en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10149/107314en
dc.description.abstractThis article contends that the confrontation between Sir Francis Hastings and the new king of England, in the winter of 1604–5, was of far more lasting significance in determining King James's religious policy than the Hampton Court Conference, which had left many grievances of the most dogmatic and zealous Calvinists largely unresolved. The showdown was prompted by James's apparent leniency towards Catholicism and his role in the peace process with Spain. James emerged from the encounter as a king of real political ability who turned the episode to his advantage; using the opportunity to ‘tackle’ the Catholic threat and ‘subdue’ the nonconforming puritan ministers whilst also endeavouring to energize local government. Thereafter, he was able to defuse religious friction for much of the rest of his reign.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherCambridge University Pressen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.journals.cambridge.org/abstract_S0018246X98007924en
dc.rightsSubject to restrictions, author can archive publisher's version/PDF. For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ [Accessed 07/07/2010]en
dc.subjectHastings, Francisen
dc.subjectJames VIen
dc.subjectreligious policyen
dc.subjectCatholicismen
dc.subjectpeaceen
dc.subjectSpainen
dc.titleSir Francis Hastings and the religious education of James VI and Ien
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Teesside. Department of Sociology.en
dc.identifier.journalThe Historical Journalen
ref.citationcount0 [Scopus and Web of Science, 07/07/2010]en
or.citation.harvardNewton, D. (1998) 'Sir Francis Hastings and the religious education of James VI and I', The Historical Journal, 41 (4), pp.917-934.en
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