Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/132889
Title:
Animating painting
Authors:
McMorran, F. (Fin)
Affiliation:
Teesside University
Conference:
Image 2.0: Digital Media Futures, University College Falmouth, September, 2009
Issue Date:
Sep-2009
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/132889
Additional Links:
http://www.falmouth.ac.uk/151/news-from-university-college-falmouth-5/media-releases-47/ucf-hosts-international-conference-on-digital-media-futures-2907.html
Abstract:
New Media developments have often concentrated on the behavioural aspects of artworks, placing emphasis on the technological, the interactive and the social at the expense of the visual. Computer-based art has developed out of roots in Computing and Mathematics, with a legacy of vector-based visual economy and Performance/ Video characterised by a photographic aesthetic. Both are in contrast to the tradition of the autographic or organic in Painting. Painters and Printmakers (such as John Keane, James Faure Walker) increasingly make use of computers in their daily practice, as a process towards the development of a physical object. This uses the computer’s ability to copy, transform and manipulate, often from a photographic source. Few artists make work for the monitor itself; a notable exception being the photo-collage based works of Nicolas Clauss. This practice-based research project explores the computer as both tool and medium for works which exist as Paintings within the monitor or in projection, where they can be both animated and interactive. It investigates the essential qualities of the medium not only the theoretical and philosophical but also the visual, behavioural and sensual to develop Animated and Interactive Painting as rich and immersive, time-based media. While New Media foregrounds Play, and the Digital aesthetic calls for speed, Interactive Painting seeks to engage the user/viewer emotionally and physically, interactively as "slow media". This emergent genre is informed also by traditional animation techniques and by developments in artists' film, notably Jeremy Blake's contribution to the development of artist's film into the digital. This suggests the computer as a visual medium which offers rich texture, complex layering, and intense saturated colour, using the specific quality of light and combining this with a degree of figuration and user/viewer action to offer the potential of accessible narrative.
Type:
Meetings and Proceedings
Language:
en

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMcMorran, F. (Fin)en
dc.date.accessioned2011-06-09T13:07:05Z-
dc.date.available2011-06-09T13:07:05Z-
dc.date.issued2009-09-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10149/132889-
dc.description.abstractNew Media developments have often concentrated on the behavioural aspects of artworks, placing emphasis on the technological, the interactive and the social at the expense of the visual. Computer-based art has developed out of roots in Computing and Mathematics, with a legacy of vector-based visual economy and Performance/ Video characterised by a photographic aesthetic. Both are in contrast to the tradition of the autographic or organic in Painting. Painters and Printmakers (such as John Keane, James Faure Walker) increasingly make use of computers in their daily practice, as a process towards the development of a physical object. This uses the computer’s ability to copy, transform and manipulate, often from a photographic source. Few artists make work for the monitor itself; a notable exception being the photo-collage based works of Nicolas Clauss. This practice-based research project explores the computer as both tool and medium for works which exist as Paintings within the monitor or in projection, where they can be both animated and interactive. It investigates the essential qualities of the medium not only the theoretical and philosophical but also the visual, behavioural and sensual to develop Animated and Interactive Painting as rich and immersive, time-based media. While New Media foregrounds Play, and the Digital aesthetic calls for speed, Interactive Painting seeks to engage the user/viewer emotionally and physically, interactively as "slow media". This emergent genre is informed also by traditional animation techniques and by developments in artists' film, notably Jeremy Blake's contribution to the development of artist's film into the digital. This suggests the computer as a visual medium which offers rich texture, complex layering, and intense saturated colour, using the specific quality of light and combining this with a degree of figuration and user/viewer action to offer the potential of accessible narrative.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.falmouth.ac.uk/151/news-from-university-college-falmouth-5/media-releases-47/ucf-hosts-international-conference-on-digital-media-futures-2907.html-
dc.titleAnimating paintingen
dc.typeMeetings and Proceedingsen
dc.contributor.departmentTeesside Universityen
dc.identifier.conferenceImage 2.0: Digital Media Futures, University College Falmouth, September, 2009en
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