Pre-operative traction for hip fractures in adults

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/204189
Title:
Pre-operative traction for hip fractures in adults
Authors:
Handoll, H. H. G. (Helen); Queally, J. M. (Joseph); Parker, M. J. (Martyn)
Affiliation:
Teesside University. Health and Social Care Institute.
Citation:
Handoll, H., Queally, J.M., and Parker, M.J. (2011) 'Pre-operative traction for hip fractures in adults', Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, 12, CD000168.
Publisher:
John Wiley & Sons Ltd
Journal:
Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews
Issue Date:
7-Dec-2011
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/204189
DOI:
10.1002/14651858.CD000168.pub3
PubMed ID:
22161361
Additional Links:
http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/14651858.CD000168.pub3/abstract
Abstract:
For people with hip fractures, traction involves either using tapes (skin traction) or pins (skeletal traction) attached to the injured leg and connected to weights via a pulley. The application of traction before surgery is thought to relieve pain and make the subsequent surgery easier. Where traction is not used, the injured limb is usually placed on a pillow and the patient encouraged to adopt a position of greatest comfort. This review summarising the evidence from randomised controlled trials included 11 trials with 1654 participants. Consistent with the general hip fracture population, most of the trial participants were older persons of around 80 years of age and the majority were female. Ten trials compared traction versus no traction and two trials, including one of the preceding 10 trials, compared skin and skeletal traction. As well as limitations in the trial methods, there were very limited data for pooling and a lack of information about the longer-term consequences of applying or not applying traction. Nonetheless, the evidence from the 10 trials consistently showed no evidence to support the supposed advantages of traction described above. There were inconclusive data for pressures sores (skin ulcers) and other complications. One trial reported three adverse effects (sensory disturbance and skin blisters) related to skin traction; all were minor.
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Keywords:
pre-operative traction; hip fracture
ISSN:
1469-493X
Rights:
Author can archive publisher's version/PDF. For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ [Accessed 23/01/2012]; In return for the grant of the licence, the author(s) shall have the following rights: The right to post the review as an electronic copy on the author's own website and/or the author's institution's website, using the PDF version of the review available in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. [Advice from CEO of The Cochrane Collaboration]
Citation Count:
0 [Scopus and WOS, 26/01/2012]

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHandoll, H. H. G. (Helen)en
dc.contributor.authorQueally, J. M. (Joseph)en
dc.contributor.authorParker, M. J. (Martyn)en
dc.date.accessioned2012-01-23T14:03:22Z-
dc.date.available2012-01-23T14:03:22Z-
dc.date.issued2011-12-07-
dc.identifier.citationCochrane Database of Systematic Reviews; 12: CD000168en
dc.identifier.issn1469-493X-
dc.identifier.pmid22161361-
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/14651858.CD000168.pub3-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10149/204189-
dc.description.abstractFor people with hip fractures, traction involves either using tapes (skin traction) or pins (skeletal traction) attached to the injured leg and connected to weights via a pulley. The application of traction before surgery is thought to relieve pain and make the subsequent surgery easier. Where traction is not used, the injured limb is usually placed on a pillow and the patient encouraged to adopt a position of greatest comfort. This review summarising the evidence from randomised controlled trials included 11 trials with 1654 participants. Consistent with the general hip fracture population, most of the trial participants were older persons of around 80 years of age and the majority were female. Ten trials compared traction versus no traction and two trials, including one of the preceding 10 trials, compared skin and skeletal traction. As well as limitations in the trial methods, there were very limited data for pooling and a lack of information about the longer-term consequences of applying or not applying traction. Nonetheless, the evidence from the 10 trials consistently showed no evidence to support the supposed advantages of traction described above. There were inconclusive data for pressures sores (skin ulcers) and other complications. One trial reported three adverse effects (sensory disturbance and skin blisters) related to skin traction; all were minor.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherJohn Wiley & Sons Ltden
dc.relation.urlhttp://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/14651858.CD000168.pub3/abstracten
dc.rightsAuthor can archive publisher's version/PDF. For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ [Accessed 23/01/2012]en
dc.rightsIn return for the grant of the licence, the author(s) shall have the following rights: The right to post the review as an electronic copy on the author's own website and/or the author's institution's website, using the PDF version of the review available in the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. [Advice from CEO of The Cochrane Collaboration]en
dc.subjectpre-operative tractionen
dc.subjecthip fractureen
dc.titlePre-operative traction for hip fractures in adultsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentTeesside University. Health and Social Care Institute.en
dc.identifier.journalCochrane Database of Systematic Reviewsen
ref.citationcount0 [Scopus and WOS, 26/01/2012]en
or.citation.harvardHandoll, H., Queally, J.M., and Parker, M.J. (2011) 'Pre-operative traction for hip fractures in adults', Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, 12, CD000168.en

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