Judgments relative to patterns: how temporal sequence patterns affect judgments and memory

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/212691
Title:
Judgments relative to patterns: how temporal sequence patterns affect judgments and memory
Authors:
Kusev, P. (Petko); Ayton, P. (Peter); van Schaik, P. (Paul) ( 0000-0001-5322-6554 ) ; Tsaneva-Atanasova, K. (Krasimira); Stewart, N. (Neil); Chater, N. (Nick)
Affiliation:
Teesside University
Citation:
Kusev, P., Ayton, P., van Schaik, P., Tsaneva-Atanasova, K., Stewart, N. and Chater, N. (2011) 'Judgments relative to patterns: how temporal sequence patterns affect judgments and memory', Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 37 (6), pp. 1874-1886.
Publisher:
American Psychological Association
Journal:
Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance
Issue Date:
Dec-2011
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/212691
DOI:
10.1037/a0025589
Additional Links:
http://doi.apa.org/getdoi.cfm?doi=10.1037/a0025589
Abstract:
Six experiments studied relative frequency judgment and recall of sequentially presented items drawn from 2 distinct categories (i.e., city and animal). The experiments show that judged frequencies of categories of sequentially encountered stimuli are affected by certain properties of the sequence configuration. We found (a) a first-run effect whereby people overestimated the frequency of a given category when that category was the first repeated category to occur in the sequence and (b) a dissociation between judgments and recall; respondents may judge 1 event more likely than the other and yet recall more instances of the latter. Specifically, the distribution of recalled items does not correspond to the frequency estimates for the event categories, indicating that participants do not make frequency judgments by sampling their memory for individual items as implied by other accounts such as the availability heuristic (Tversky & Kahneman, 1973) and the availability process model (Hastie & Park, 1986). We interpret these findings as reflecting the operation of a judgment heuristic sensitive to sequential patterns and offer an account for the relationship between memory and judged frequencies of sequentially encountered stimuli.
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Keywords:
categorization; frequency judgments; memory; temporal-sequence patterns
ISSN:
1939-1277; 0096-1523
Rights:
Author can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing). For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ [Accessed 24/12/2012]
Citation Count:
0 [Scopus, 24/02/2012]

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorKusev, P. (Petko)en_GB
dc.contributor.authorAyton, P. (Peter)en_GB
dc.contributor.authorvan Schaik, P. (Paul)en_GB
dc.contributor.authorTsaneva-Atanasova, K. (Krasimira)en_GB
dc.contributor.authorStewart, N. (Neil)en_GB
dc.contributor.authorChater, N. (Nick)en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-24T11:58:16Zen
dc.date.available2012-02-24T11:58:16Zen
dc.date.issued2011-12en
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance; 37 (6):1874 -1886en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1939-1277en
dc.identifier.issn0096-1523en
dc.identifier.doi10.1037/a0025589en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10149/212691en
dc.description.abstractSix experiments studied relative frequency judgment and recall of sequentially presented items drawn from 2 distinct categories (i.e., city and animal). The experiments show that judged frequencies of categories of sequentially encountered stimuli are affected by certain properties of the sequence configuration. We found (a) a first-run effect whereby people overestimated the frequency of a given category when that category was the first repeated category to occur in the sequence and (b) a dissociation between judgments and recall; respondents may judge 1 event more likely than the other and yet recall more instances of the latter. Specifically, the distribution of recalled items does not correspond to the frequency estimates for the event categories, indicating that participants do not make frequency judgments by sampling their memory for individual items as implied by other accounts such as the availability heuristic (Tversky & Kahneman, 1973) and the availability process model (Hastie & Park, 1986). We interpret these findings as reflecting the operation of a judgment heuristic sensitive to sequential patterns and offer an account for the relationship between memory and judged frequencies of sequentially encountered stimuli.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherAmerican Psychological Associationen_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://doi.apa.org/getdoi.cfm?doi=10.1037/a0025589en_GB
dc.rightsAuthor can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing). For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ [Accessed 24/12/2012]en_GB
dc.subjectcategorizationen_GB
dc.subjectfrequency judgmentsen_GB
dc.subjectmemoryen_GB
dc.subjecttemporal-sequence patternsen_GB
dc.titleJudgments relative to patterns: how temporal sequence patterns affect judgments and memoryen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentTeesside Universityen_GB
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performanceen_GB
ref.citationcount0 [Scopus, 24/02/2012]en_GB
or.citation.harvardKusev, P., Ayton, P., van Schaik, P., Tsaneva-Atanasova, K., Stewart, N. and Chater, N. (2011) 'Judgments relative to patterns: how temporal sequence patterns affect judgments and memory', Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, 37 (6), pp. 1874-1886.en
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