Diurnal variation in the salivary melatonin responses to exercise: relation to exercise-mediated tachycardia

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/218092
Title:
Diurnal variation in the salivary melatonin responses to exercise: relation to exercise-mediated tachycardia
Authors:
Marrin, K. (Kelly); Drust, B. (Barry); Gregson, W. (Warren); Morris, C. J.; Chester, N. (Neil); Atkinson, G. (Greg)
Affiliation:
Edge Hill University. Sport and Exercise Research Group.
Citation:
Marrin, K., Drust, B., Gregson, W., Morris, C. J., Chester, N., & Atkinson, G. (2011) 'Diurnal variation in the salivary melatonin responses to exercise: relation to exercise-mediated tachycardia', European Journal of Applied Physiology, 111 (11), pp.2707-2714.
Publisher:
Springer Verlag
Journal:
European Journal of Applied Physiology
Issue Date:
Nov-2011
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/218092
DOI:
10.1007/s00421-011-1890-7
PubMed ID:
21399961
Abstract:
Salivary melatonin concentration is an established marker of human circadian rhythmicity. It is thought that melatonin is relatively robust to the masking effects of exercise. Nevertheless, the extent and even the direction of exercise-related change is unclear, possibly due to between-study differences in the time of day exercise is completed. Therefore, we aimed to compare melatonin responses between morning and afternoon exercise, and explore the relationships between exercise-related changes in melatonin and heart rate. At 08:00 and 17:00 hours, seven male subjects (mean ± SD age, 27 ± 5 years) completed 30 min of cycling at 70% peak oxygen uptake followed by 30 min of rest. Light intensity was maintained at ~150 lx. Salivary melatonin (ELISA) and heart rate were measured at baseline, 15 min during exercise, immediately post-exercise and following 30 min recovery. Melatonin was ≈15 pg ml(-1) higher in the morning trials compared with the afternoon (P = 0.030). The exercise-related increase in melatonin was more pronounced (P = 0.024) in the morning (11.1 ± 8.7 pg ml(-1)) than in the afternoon (5.1 ± 5.7 pg ml(-1)). The slope of the heart rate-melatonin relationship was significantly (P = 0.020) steeper in the morning (0.12 pg ml(-1) beats(-1 )min(-1)) than in the afternoon (0.03 pg ml(-1) beats(-1 )min(-1)). In conclusion, we report for the first time that the masking effect of moderate-intensity exercise on melatonin is approximately twice as high in the morning than the afternoon. The much steeper relationship between heart rate and melatonin changes in the morning raises the possibility that time of day alters the relationships between exercise-mediated sympathetic nervous activity and melatonin secretion.
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Keywords:
pineal function; circadian rhythm; exercise; exercise test; heart rate; melatonin; observer variation; physical exertion; saliva; tachycardia; time factors
ISSN:
1439-6327
Rights:
Author can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing). For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ [Accessed 10/04/2012].
Citation Count:
0 [Scopus, 10/04/2012]

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMarrin, K. (Kelly)en_GB
dc.contributor.authorDrust, B. (Barry)en_GB
dc.contributor.authorGregson, W. (Warren)en_GB
dc.contributor.authorMorris, C. J.en_GB
dc.contributor.authorChester, N. (Neil)en_GB
dc.contributor.authorAtkinson, G. (Greg)en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-04-10T15:53:27Z-
dc.date.available2012-04-10T15:53:27Z-
dc.date.issued2011-11-
dc.identifier.citationEuropean Journal of Applied Physiology; 111 (11): 2707-2714en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1439-6327-
dc.identifier.pmid21399961-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s00421-011-1890-7-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10149/218092-
dc.description.abstractSalivary melatonin concentration is an established marker of human circadian rhythmicity. It is thought that melatonin is relatively robust to the masking effects of exercise. Nevertheless, the extent and even the direction of exercise-related change is unclear, possibly due to between-study differences in the time of day exercise is completed. Therefore, we aimed to compare melatonin responses between morning and afternoon exercise, and explore the relationships between exercise-related changes in melatonin and heart rate. At 08:00 and 17:00 hours, seven male subjects (mean ± SD age, 27 ± 5 years) completed 30 min of cycling at 70% peak oxygen uptake followed by 30 min of rest. Light intensity was maintained at ~150 lx. Salivary melatonin (ELISA) and heart rate were measured at baseline, 15 min during exercise, immediately post-exercise and following 30 min recovery. Melatonin was ≈15 pg ml(-1) higher in the morning trials compared with the afternoon (P = 0.030). The exercise-related increase in melatonin was more pronounced (P = 0.024) in the morning (11.1 ± 8.7 pg ml(-1)) than in the afternoon (5.1 ± 5.7 pg ml(-1)). The slope of the heart rate-melatonin relationship was significantly (P = 0.020) steeper in the morning (0.12 pg ml(-1) beats(-1 )min(-1)) than in the afternoon (0.03 pg ml(-1) beats(-1 )min(-1)). In conclusion, we report for the first time that the masking effect of moderate-intensity exercise on melatonin is approximately twice as high in the morning than the afternoon. The much steeper relationship between heart rate and melatonin changes in the morning raises the possibility that time of day alters the relationships between exercise-mediated sympathetic nervous activity and melatonin secretion.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSpringer Verlagen_GB
dc.rightsAuthor can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing). For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ [Accessed 10/04/2012].en_GB
dc.subjectpineal functionen_GB
dc.subjectcircadian rhythmen_GB
dc.subjectexerciseen_GB
dc.subjectexercise testen_GB
dc.subjectheart rateen_GB
dc.subjectmelatoninen_GB
dc.subjectobserver variationen_GB
dc.subjectphysical exertionen_GB
dc.subjectsalivaen_GB
dc.subjecttachycardiaen_GB
dc.subjecttime factorsen_GB
dc.titleDiurnal variation in the salivary melatonin responses to exercise: relation to exercise-mediated tachycardiaen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentEdge Hill University. Sport and Exercise Research Group.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalEuropean Journal of Applied Physiologyen_GB
ref.citationcount0 [Scopus, 10/04/2012]en_GB
or.citation.harvardMarrin, K., Drust, B., Gregson, W., Morris, C. J., Chester, N., & Atkinson, G. (2011) 'Diurnal variation in the salivary melatonin responses to exercise: relation to exercise-mediated tachycardia', European Journal of Applied Physiology, 111 (11), pp.2707-2714.en_GB
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