Contribution of arterial Windkessel in low-frequency cerebral hemodynamics during transient changes in blood pressure

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/218255
Title:
Contribution of arterial Windkessel in low-frequency cerebral hemodynamics during transient changes in blood pressure
Authors:
Chan, G. S. H. (Gregory); Ainslie, P. N. (Philip); Willie, C. K. (Chris); Taylor, C. E. (Chloe); Atkinson, G. (Greg); Jones, H. (Helen); Lovell, N. H. (Nigel); Tzeng, Y-C. (YuChieh)
Affiliation:
University of Otago
Citation:
Chan, G.S., Ainslie, P.N., Willie, C.K., Taylor, C.E., Atkinson, G., Jones, H., Lovell, N.H. and Tzeng, Y.C. (2011) 'Contribution of arterial Windkessel in low-frequency cerebral hemodynamics during transient changes in blood pressure', Journal of Applied Physiology, 110(4), pp.917-925.
Publisher:
American Physiological Society
Journal:
Journal of Applied Physiology
Issue Date:
Apr-2011
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/218255
DOI:
10.1152/japplphysiol.01407.2010
PubMed ID:
21292835
Additional Links:
http://jap.physiology.org/content/110/4/917
Abstract:
The Windkessel properties of the vasculature are known to play a significant role in buffering arterial pulsations, but their potential importance in dampening low-frequency fluctuations in cerebral blood flow has not been clearly examined. In this study, we quantitatively assessed the contribution of arterial Windkessel (peripheral compliance and resistance) in the dynamic cerebral blood flow response to relatively large and acute changes in blood pressure. Middle cerebral artery flow velocity (MCA(V); transcranial Doppler) and arterial blood pressure were recorded from 14 healthy subjects. Low-pass-filtered pressure-flow responses (<0.15 Hz) during transient hypertension (intravenous phenylephrine) and hypotension (intravenous sodium nitroprusside) were fitted to a two-element Windkessel model. The Windkessel model was found to provide a superior goodness of fit to the MCA(V) responses during both hypertension and hypotension (R² = 0.89 ± 0.03 and 0.85 ± 0.05, respectively), with a significant improvement in adjusted coefficients of determination (P < 0.005) compared with the single-resistance model (R² = 0.62 ± 0.06 and 0.61 ± 0.08, respectively). No differences were found between the two interventions in the Windkessel capacitive and resistive gains, suggesting similar vascular properties during pressure rise and fall episodes. The results highlight that low-frequency cerebral hemodynamic responses to transient hypertension and hypotension may include a significant contribution from the mechanical properties of vasculature and, thus, cannot solely be attributed to the active control of vascular tone by cerebral autoregulation. The arterial Windkessel should be regarded as an important element of dynamic cerebral blood flow modulation during large and acute blood pressure perturbation.
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Keywords:
blood flow velocity; blood pressure; cerebrovascular circulation; electrocardiography; hemodynamics; cerebral blood flow; transcranial doppler
ISSN:
1522-1601
Rights:
Author cannot archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing). For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ [Accessed 12/04/2012].
Citation Count:
4 [Scopus, 12/04/2012]

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorChan, G. S. H. (Gregory)en_GB
dc.contributor.authorAinslie, P. N. (Philip)en_GB
dc.contributor.authorWillie, C. K. (Chris)en_GB
dc.contributor.authorTaylor, C. E. (Chloe)en_GB
dc.contributor.authorAtkinson, G. (Greg)en_GB
dc.contributor.authorJones, H. (Helen)en_GB
dc.contributor.authorLovell, N. H. (Nigel)en_GB
dc.contributor.authorTzeng, Y-C. (YuChieh)en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-04-12T09:28:59Z-
dc.date.available2012-04-12T09:28:59Z-
dc.date.issued2011-04-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Applied Physiology; 110(4): 917-925en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1522-1601-
dc.identifier.pmid21292835-
dc.identifier.doi10.1152/japplphysiol.01407.2010-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10149/218255-
dc.description.abstractThe Windkessel properties of the vasculature are known to play a significant role in buffering arterial pulsations, but their potential importance in dampening low-frequency fluctuations in cerebral blood flow has not been clearly examined. In this study, we quantitatively assessed the contribution of arterial Windkessel (peripheral compliance and resistance) in the dynamic cerebral blood flow response to relatively large and acute changes in blood pressure. Middle cerebral artery flow velocity (MCA(V); transcranial Doppler) and arterial blood pressure were recorded from 14 healthy subjects. Low-pass-filtered pressure-flow responses (<0.15 Hz) during transient hypertension (intravenous phenylephrine) and hypotension (intravenous sodium nitroprusside) were fitted to a two-element Windkessel model. The Windkessel model was found to provide a superior goodness of fit to the MCA(V) responses during both hypertension and hypotension (R² = 0.89 ± 0.03 and 0.85 ± 0.05, respectively), with a significant improvement in adjusted coefficients of determination (P < 0.005) compared with the single-resistance model (R² = 0.62 ± 0.06 and 0.61 ± 0.08, respectively). No differences were found between the two interventions in the Windkessel capacitive and resistive gains, suggesting similar vascular properties during pressure rise and fall episodes. The results highlight that low-frequency cerebral hemodynamic responses to transient hypertension and hypotension may include a significant contribution from the mechanical properties of vasculature and, thus, cannot solely be attributed to the active control of vascular tone by cerebral autoregulation. The arterial Windkessel should be regarded as an important element of dynamic cerebral blood flow modulation during large and acute blood pressure perturbation.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherAmerican Physiological Societyen_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://jap.physiology.org/content/110/4/917en_GB
dc.rightsAuthor cannot archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing). For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ [Accessed 12/04/2012].en_GB
dc.subjectblood flow velocityen_GB
dc.subjectblood pressureen_GB
dc.subjectcerebrovascular circulationen_GB
dc.subjectelectrocardiographyen_GB
dc.subjecthemodynamicsen_GB
dc.subjectcerebral blood flowen_GB
dc.subjecttranscranial doppleren_GB
dc.titleContribution of arterial Windkessel in low-frequency cerebral hemodynamics during transient changes in blood pressureen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Otagoen_GB
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Applied Physiologyen_GB
ref.citationcount4 [Scopus, 12/04/2012]en_GB
or.citation.harvardChan, G.S., Ainslie, P.N., Willie, C.K., Taylor, C.E., Atkinson, G., Jones, H., Lovell, N.H. and Tzeng, Y.C. (2011) 'Contribution of arterial Windkessel in low-frequency cerebral hemodynamics during transient changes in blood pressure', Journal of Applied Physiology, 110(4), pp.917-925.en_GB

Related articles on PubMed

All Items in TeesRep are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.