Assessment of flow-mediated dilation in humans: a methodological and physiological guideline

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/218271
Title:
Assessment of flow-mediated dilation in humans: a methodological and physiological guideline
Authors:
Thijssen, D. H. J. (Dick); Black, M. A. (Mark); Pyke, K. E. (Kyra); Padilla, J. (Jaume); Atkinson, G. (Greg); Harris, R. A. (Ryan); Parker, B. (Beth); Widlansky, M. E. (Michael); Tschakovsky, M. E. (Michael); Green, D. J. (Daniel)
Affiliation:
Liverpool John Moores University. Research Institute for Sport and Exercise Sciences.
Citation:
Thijssen, D.H., Black, M.A., Pyke, K.E., Padilla, J., Atkinson, G., Harris, R.A., Parker, B., Widlansky, M.E. and Green, D.J. (2011) 'Assessment of flow-mediated dilation in humans: a methodological and physiological guideline' American Journal of Physiology: Heart and Circulatory Physiology, 300(1). pp.H2-H12.
Publisher:
American Physiological Society
Journal:
American Journal of Physiology. Heart and circulatory physiology
Issue Date:
Jan-2011
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/218271
DOI:
10.1152/ajpheart.00471.2010
PubMed ID:
20952670
Additional Links:
http://ajpheart.physiology.org/content/300/1/H2.abstract?sid=4774f7f8-06e2-43fd-a14e-2b152ee8b44e
Abstract:
Endothelial dysfunction is now considered an important early event in the development of atherosclerosis, which precedes gross morphological signs and clinical symptoms. The assessment of flow-mediated dilation (FMD) was introduced almost 20 years ago as a noninvasive approach to examine vasodilator function in vivo. FMD is widely believed to reflect endothelium-dependent and largely nitric oxide-mediated arterial function and has been used as a surrogate marker of vascular health. This noninvasive technique has been used to compare groups of subjects and to evaluate the impact of interventions within individuals. Despite its widespread adoption, there is considerable variability between studies with respect to the protocols applied, methods of analysis, and interpretation of results. Moreover, differences in methodological approaches have important impacts on the response magnitude, can result in spurious data interpretation, and limit the comparability of outcomes between studies. This review results from a collegial discussion between physiologists with the purpose of developing considered guidelines. The contributors represent several distinct research groups that have independently worked to advance the evidence base for improvement of the technical approaches to FMD measurement and analysis. The outcome is a series of recommendations on the basis of review and critical appraisal of recent physiological studies, pertaining to the most appropriate methods to assess FMD in humans.
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Keywords:
hemodynamics; vasodilation; endothelial function; vascular function; shear rate; atherosclerosis; cardiovascular risk; methodology
ISSN:
0363-6135
EISSN:
1522-1539
Rights:
Author cannot archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing). For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ [Accessed 12/04/2012].
Citation Count:
34 [Scopus, 12/04/2012]

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorThijssen, D. H. J. (Dick)en_GB
dc.contributor.authorBlack, M. A. (Mark)en_GB
dc.contributor.authorPyke, K. E. (Kyra)en_GB
dc.contributor.authorPadilla, J. (Jaume)en_GB
dc.contributor.authorAtkinson, G. (Greg)en_GB
dc.contributor.authorHarris, R. A. (Ryan)en_GB
dc.contributor.authorParker, B. (Beth)en_GB
dc.contributor.authorWidlansky, M. E. (Michael)en_GB
dc.contributor.authorTschakovsky, M. E. (Michael)en_GB
dc.contributor.authorGreen, D. J. (Daniel)en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-04-12T10:59:13Z-
dc.date.available2012-04-12T10:59:13Z-
dc.date.issued2011-01-
dc.identifier.citationAmerican Journal of Physiology: Heart and Circulatory Physiology; 300(1): H2-H12en_GB
dc.identifier.issn0363-6135-
dc.identifier.pmid20952670-
dc.identifier.doi10.1152/ajpheart.00471.2010-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10149/218271-
dc.description.abstractEndothelial dysfunction is now considered an important early event in the development of atherosclerosis, which precedes gross morphological signs and clinical symptoms. The assessment of flow-mediated dilation (FMD) was introduced almost 20 years ago as a noninvasive approach to examine vasodilator function in vivo. FMD is widely believed to reflect endothelium-dependent and largely nitric oxide-mediated arterial function and has been used as a surrogate marker of vascular health. This noninvasive technique has been used to compare groups of subjects and to evaluate the impact of interventions within individuals. Despite its widespread adoption, there is considerable variability between studies with respect to the protocols applied, methods of analysis, and interpretation of results. Moreover, differences in methodological approaches have important impacts on the response magnitude, can result in spurious data interpretation, and limit the comparability of outcomes between studies. This review results from a collegial discussion between physiologists with the purpose of developing considered guidelines. The contributors represent several distinct research groups that have independently worked to advance the evidence base for improvement of the technical approaches to FMD measurement and analysis. The outcome is a series of recommendations on the basis of review and critical appraisal of recent physiological studies, pertaining to the most appropriate methods to assess FMD in humans.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherAmerican Physiological Societyen_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://ajpheart.physiology.org/content/300/1/H2.abstract?sid=4774f7f8-06e2-43fd-a14e-2b152ee8b44een_GB
dc.rightsAuthor cannot archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing). For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ [Accessed 12/04/2012].en_GB
dc.subjecthemodynamicsen_GB
dc.subjectvasodilationen_GB
dc.subjectendothelial functionen_GB
dc.subjectvascular functionen_GB
dc.subjectshear rateen_GB
dc.subjectatherosclerosisen_GB
dc.subjectcardiovascular risken_GB
dc.subjectmethodologyen_GB
dc.titleAssessment of flow-mediated dilation in humans: a methodological and physiological guidelineen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn1522-1539-
dc.contributor.departmentLiverpool John Moores University. Research Institute for Sport and Exercise Sciences.en_GB
dc.identifier.journalAmerican Journal of Physiology. Heart and circulatory physiologyen_GB
ref.citationcount34 [Scopus, 12/04/2012]en_GB
or.citation.harvardThijssen, D.H., Black, M.A., Pyke, K.E., Padilla, J., Atkinson, G., Harris, R.A., Parker, B., Widlansky, M.E. and Green, D.J. (2011) 'Assessment of flow-mediated dilation in humans: a methodological and physiological guideline' American Journal of Physiology: Heart and Circulatory Physiology, 300(1). pp.H2-H12.en_GB

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