Exploring passive user interaction for adaptive narratives

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/218598
Title:
Exploring passive user interaction for adaptive narratives
Book Title:
Proceedings of the 2012 ACM International Conference on Intelligent User Interfaces
Authors:
Gilroy, S. W. (Stephen); Porteous, J. (Julie); Charles, F. (Fred); Cavazza, M. O. (Marc)
Affiliation:
Teesside University. School of Computing.
Citation:
Gilroy, S.W., Porteous, J., Charles, F. and Cavazza, M.O. (2012) 'Exploring passive user interaction for adaptive narratives', Proceedings of the 17th ACM International Conference on Intelligent User Interfaces, Lisbon, Portugal. 14-17 February 2012, New York: ACM, pp.119-128.
Publisher:
ACM
Conference:
17th ACM International Conference on Intelligent User Interfaces, Lisbon, Portugal. 14-17 February, 2012.
Issue Date:
2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/218598
DOI:
10.1145/2166966.2166990
Additional Links:
http://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?doid=2166966.2166990
Abstract:
Previous Interactive Storytelling systems have been designed to allow active user intervention in an unfolding story, using established multi-modal interactive techniques to influence narrative development. In this paper we instead explore the use of a form of passive interaction where users' affective responses, measured by physiological proxies, drive a process of narrative adaptation. We introduce a system that implements a passive interaction loop as part of narrative generation, monitoring users' physiological responses to an on-going narrative visualization and using these to adapt the subsequent development of character relationships, narrative focus and pacing. Idiomatic cinematographic techniques applied to the visualization utilize existing theories of establishing characteristic emotional tone and viewer expectations to foster additional user response. Experimental results support the applicability of filmic emotional theories in a non-film visual realization, demonstrating significant appropriate user physiological response to narrative events and "emotional cues". The subsequent narrative adaptation provides a variation of viewing experience with no loss of narrative comprehension.
Type:
Meetings and Proceedings
Language:
en
Keywords:
passive interaction; interactive storytelling
ISBN:
9781450310482
Sponsors:
This work has been funded (in part) by the European Commission under grant agreements IRIS (FP7-ICT- 231824) and CEEDs (FP7-ICT-258749).
Rights:
ACM allows authors' versions of their own ACM-copyrighted work on thier personal server or on servers belonging to their employers. For full details see http://www.acm.org/publications/policies/RightsResponsibilities [Accessed 16/04/2012].
Citation Count:
No citation information available on Web of Science or Scopus

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorGilroy, S. W. (Stephen)en_GB
dc.contributor.authorPorteous, J. (Julie)en_GB
dc.contributor.authorCharles, F. (Fred)en_GB
dc.contributor.authorCavazza, M. O. (Marc)en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-04-16T15:29:48Z-
dc.date.available2012-04-16T15:29:48Z-
dc.date.issued2012-
dc.identifier.isbn9781450310482-
dc.identifier.doi10.1145/2166966.2166990-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10149/218598-
dc.description.abstractPrevious Interactive Storytelling systems have been designed to allow active user intervention in an unfolding story, using established multi-modal interactive techniques to influence narrative development. In this paper we instead explore the use of a form of passive interaction where users' affective responses, measured by physiological proxies, drive a process of narrative adaptation. We introduce a system that implements a passive interaction loop as part of narrative generation, monitoring users' physiological responses to an on-going narrative visualization and using these to adapt the subsequent development of character relationships, narrative focus and pacing. Idiomatic cinematographic techniques applied to the visualization utilize existing theories of establishing characteristic emotional tone and viewer expectations to foster additional user response. Experimental results support the applicability of filmic emotional theories in a non-film visual realization, demonstrating significant appropriate user physiological response to narrative events and "emotional cues". The subsequent narrative adaptation provides a variation of viewing experience with no loss of narrative comprehension.en_GB
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work has been funded (in part) by the European Commission under grant agreements IRIS (FP7-ICT- 231824) and CEEDs (FP7-ICT-258749).en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherACMen_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://dl.acm.org/citation.cfm?doid=2166966.2166990en_GB
dc.rightsACM allows authors' versions of their own ACM-copyrighted work on thier personal server or on servers belonging to their employers. For full details see http://www.acm.org/publications/policies/RightsResponsibilities [Accessed 16/04/2012].en_GB
dc.subjectpassive interactionen_GB
dc.subjectinteractive storytellingen_GB
dc.titleExploring passive user interaction for adaptive narrativesen
dc.typeMeetings and Proceedingsen
dc.contributor.departmentTeesside University. School of Computing.en_GB
dc.title.bookProceedings of the 2012 ACM International Conference on Intelligent User Interfacesen_GB
dc.identifier.conference17th ACM International Conference on Intelligent User Interfaces, Lisbon, Portugal. 14-17 February, 2012.en_GB
ref.citationcountNo citation information available on Web of Science or Scopusen_GB
or.citation.harvardGilroy, S.W., Porteous, J., Charles, F. and Cavazza, M.O. (2012) 'Exploring passive user interaction for adaptive narratives', Proceedings of the 17th ACM International Conference on Intelligent User Interfaces, Lisbon, Portugal. 14-17 February 2012, New York: ACM, pp.119-128.en_GB
All Items in TeesRep are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.