Original copy: Neo-Victorian versions of Oscar Wilde’s ‘voice’

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/249551
Title:
Original copy: Neo-Victorian versions of Oscar Wilde’s ‘voice’
Authors:
Davies, H. (Helen)
Affiliation:
Leeds Metropolitan University
Citation:
Davies, H. (2011) ‘Original Copy: Neo-Victorian Versions of Oscar Wilde’s voice’. Neo-Victorian Studies, 4(1), pp. 1-21.
Publisher:
Swansea University
Journal:
Neo-Victorian Studies
Issue Date:
Nov-2011
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/249551
Additional Links:
http://www.neovictorianstudies.com/
Abstract:
This article considers the challenge that neo-Victorian versions of Oscar Wilde's 'voice' pose to the relationship between original and copy. I argue that the concept of voice complicates Jean Baudrillard's assessment of the loss of the original in postmodern culture, as voice can be conceptualised as always already absent; voices can be understood as continuous processes of reconstruction. Establishing the significance of voice in the cultural afterlife of Oscar Wilde, I focus on Peter Ackroyd's The Last Testament of Oscar Wilde (1983) and Will Self's Dorian: An Imitation (2002) to demonstrate that neo-Victorian copies of Wilde's original voice engage with the tension between loss and recreation which often remains unquestioned in neo-Victorian criticism's invocation of the concept of voice.
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Keywords:
Peter Ackroyd; copy; Maggi Hambling; originality; repetition; postmodernism
ISSN:
1757-9481
Rights:
Neo-Victorian Studies is an open access journal.
Citation Count:
No citation information available on Web of Science or Scopus

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorDavies, H. (Helen)en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2012-10-19T08:04:45Z-
dc.date.available2012-10-19T08:04:45Z-
dc.date.issued2011-11-
dc.identifier.citationNeo-Victorian Studies; 4 (1): 1-21en_GB
dc.identifier.issn1757-9481-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10149/249551-
dc.description.abstractThis article considers the challenge that neo-Victorian versions of Oscar Wilde's 'voice' pose to the relationship between original and copy. I argue that the concept of voice complicates Jean Baudrillard's assessment of the loss of the original in postmodern culture, as voice can be conceptualised as always already absent; voices can be understood as continuous processes of reconstruction. Establishing the significance of voice in the cultural afterlife of Oscar Wilde, I focus on Peter Ackroyd's The Last Testament of Oscar Wilde (1983) and Will Self's Dorian: An Imitation (2002) to demonstrate that neo-Victorian copies of Wilde's original voice engage with the tension between loss and recreation which often remains unquestioned in neo-Victorian criticism's invocation of the concept of voice.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSwansea Universityen_GB
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.neovictorianstudies.com/en_GB
dc.rightsNeo-Victorian Studies is an open access journal.en_GB
dc.subjectPeter Ackroyden_GB
dc.subjectcopyen_GB
dc.subjectMaggi Hamblingen_GB
dc.subjectoriginalityen_GB
dc.subjectrepetitionen_GB
dc.subjectpostmodernismen_GB
dc.titleOriginal copy: Neo-Victorian versions of Oscar Wilde’s ‘voice’en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentLeeds Metropolitan Universityen_GB
dc.identifier.journalNeo-Victorian Studiesen_GB
ref.citationcountNo citation information available on Web of Science or Scopusen_GB
or.citation.harvardDavies, H. (2011) ‘Original Copy: Neo-Victorian Versions of Oscar Wilde’s voice’. Neo-Victorian Studies, 4(1), pp. 1-21.en_GB
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