Accretion, angst and antidote: the transition from knowledge worker to manager in the UK heritage sector in an era of austerity

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/313730
Title:
Accretion, angst and antidote: the transition from knowledge worker to manager in the UK heritage sector in an era of austerity
Book Title:
The Laws of the Knowledge Workplace: Changing Roles and the Meaning of Work in Knowledge-Intensive Environments.
Authors:
Bowden, A. (Alistair); Ciesielska, M. (Malgorzata)
Editors:
Jemielniak, Dariusz
Affiliation:
Teesside University. Technology Futures Institute. Teesside University Business School.
Citation:
Bowden, A. & Ciesielska, M. (2014) Accretion, angst and antidote: the transition from knowledge worker to manager in the UK heritage sector in an era of austerity. In: Jemielniak, D. (Ed) The Laws of the Knowledge Workplace: Changing Roles and the Meaning of Work in Knowledge-Intensive Environments. Ashgate
Publisher:
Ashgate
Issue Date:
6-Mar-2014
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/313730
Abstract:
The transition from worker to manager requires “a profound psychological adjustment – a transformation of professional identity” (Hill, 2004, p. 121). The transition from knowledge worker to manager of knowledge workers is particularly difficult. Some professionals find it “a big transition” or “a quantum leap” (Corlett, 2009, p. 150), whilst others “simply cannot adjust to a managerial life style” (Raelin, 1991, p. 186). This chapter present vignettes from a small sample of interviews of a group of knowledge workers – heritage managers in the UK – on their career progressions during turbulent times following global financial crisis of 2007-2008. These heritage managers began working together as advisors to a community-led heritage organisation, though their day jobs and earlier careers are in separate organisations. Each of them was interviewed twice, the first time to gain their individual perspectives on the formation of the community-led heritage organisation that they were contributing to, and the second time to explore their own career progression and how it had led them to work together. The semi-structured interviews took place in 2013 and were part of a longitudinal case study.
Type:
Book Chapter
Language:
en
Keywords:
knowledge work; heritage sector
ISBN:
978-1-4724-2388-7
Rights:
After the book is published by Ashgate/Gower, the author may upload an electronic version of their manuscript to their institutional repository server and/or their own website. For full details see http://www.ashgate.com/authors [Accessed: 23/09/2014]

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBowden, A. (Alistair)en_GB
dc.contributor.authorCiesielska, M. (Malgorzata)en_GB
dc.contributor.editorJemielniak, Dariuszen_GB
dc.date.accessioned2014-03-06T16:23:50Z-
dc.date.available2014-03-06T16:23:50Z-
dc.date.issued2014-03-06-
dc.identifier.citationBowden, A. & Ciesielska, M. (2014) Accretion, angst and antidote: the transition from knowledge worker to manager in the UK heritage sector in an era of austerity. In: Jemielniak, D. (Ed) The Laws of the Knowledge Workplace: Changing Roles and the Meaning of Work in Knowledge-Intensive Environments. Ashgateen_GB
dc.identifier.isbn978-1-4724-2388-7-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10149/313730-
dc.description.abstractThe transition from worker to manager requires “a profound psychological adjustment – a transformation of professional identity” (Hill, 2004, p. 121). The transition from knowledge worker to manager of knowledge workers is particularly difficult. Some professionals find it “a big transition” or “a quantum leap” (Corlett, 2009, p. 150), whilst others “simply cannot adjust to a managerial life style” (Raelin, 1991, p. 186). This chapter present vignettes from a small sample of interviews of a group of knowledge workers – heritage managers in the UK – on their career progressions during turbulent times following global financial crisis of 2007-2008. These heritage managers began working together as advisors to a community-led heritage organisation, though their day jobs and earlier careers are in separate organisations. Each of them was interviewed twice, the first time to gain their individual perspectives on the formation of the community-led heritage organisation that they were contributing to, and the second time to explore their own career progression and how it had led them to work together. The semi-structured interviews took place in 2013 and were part of a longitudinal case study.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherAshgateen_GB
dc.rightsAfter the book is published by Ashgate/Gower, the author may upload an electronic version of their manuscript to their institutional repository server and/or their own website. For full details see http://www.ashgate.com/authors [Accessed: 23/09/2014]-
dc.subjectknowledge worken_GB
dc.subjectheritage sectoren_GB
dc.titleAccretion, angst and antidote: the transition from knowledge worker to manager in the UK heritage sector in an era of austerityen
dc.typeBook Chapteren
dc.contributor.departmentTeesside University. Technology Futures Institute. Teesside University Business School.en_GB
dc.title.bookThe Laws of the Knowledge Workplace: Changing Roles and the Meaning of Work in Knowledge-Intensive Environments.en_GB
or.citation.harvardBowden, A. & Ciesielska, M. (2014) Accretion, angst and antidote: the transition from knowledge worker to manager in the UK heritage sector in an era of austerity. In: Jemielniak, D. (Ed) The Laws of the Knowledge Workplace: Changing Roles and the Meaning of Work in Knowledge-Intensive Environments. Ashgate-
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