Great Expectations to Hard Times: A longitudinal study of creative new ventures

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/324552
Title:
Great Expectations to Hard Times: A longitudinal study of creative new ventures
Authors:
Hanage, R. (Richard) ( 0000-0002-4896-2685 ) ; Scott, J. M. (Jonathan)
Affiliation:
Teesside University. Social Futures Institute.
Citation:
Hanage, R. & Scott, J. M. (2013) 'Great Expectations to Hard Times: A longitudinal study of creative new ventures' presented at Institute for Small Business & Entrepreneurship conference, Nov 2013, Cardiff, November.
Publisher:
ISBE
Conference:
Institute for Small Business & Entrepreneurship conference
Issue Date:
5-Nov-2013
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/324552
Additional Links:
http://www.isbe.org.uk/Hanage13
Abstract:
Purpose: This longitudinal study investigated what happened to graduates when they tried to start a digital creative business on graduating. Approach: Seven creative ‘nascent graduate entrepreneurs’ were followed for up to five years. They had been independently assessed as having ‘promise of business success’, but were young and lacking experience. The graduates were followed mainly through six-monthly semi-structured interviews, which followed their business, creative and personal development. Findings: There are three main contributions to the academic literature. First, nearly all the graduates moved on to employment so the study provides real-time data on businesses from inception to closure. Second, events in their personal lives, for instance the arrival of children, had a big impact on their business/personal decisions. Third, although the initial transition from ‘creative student’ to ‘creative entrepreneur’ was not easy it did attract plenty of business support. The subsequent attempts to make the transition from being an unsuccessful creative entrepreneur to financial stability were harder, with little external assistance being available. Practical Implications: The insights gained have practical implications for the support of creative graduate start-ups and for their on-going business or personal support as well as raising issues about the effectiveness of enterprise education and regional start-up support policy. Originality/Value: The longitudinal approach has brought new insights and indicates several areas where more research would be valuable, especially in dealing with the consequences of unsuccessful business ventures.
Type:
Meetings and Proceedings
Language:
en

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHanage, R. (Richard)en
dc.contributor.authorScott, J. M. (Jonathan)en
dc.date.accessioned2014-08-08T15:23:02Zen
dc.date.available2014-08-08T15:23:02Zen
dc.date.issued2013-11-05en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10149/324552en
dc.description.abstractPurpose: This longitudinal study investigated what happened to graduates when they tried to start a digital creative business on graduating. Approach: Seven creative ‘nascent graduate entrepreneurs’ were followed for up to five years. They had been independently assessed as having ‘promise of business success’, but were young and lacking experience. The graduates were followed mainly through six-monthly semi-structured interviews, which followed their business, creative and personal development. Findings: There are three main contributions to the academic literature. First, nearly all the graduates moved on to employment so the study provides real-time data on businesses from inception to closure. Second, events in their personal lives, for instance the arrival of children, had a big impact on their business/personal decisions. Third, although the initial transition from ‘creative student’ to ‘creative entrepreneur’ was not easy it did attract plenty of business support. The subsequent attempts to make the transition from being an unsuccessful creative entrepreneur to financial stability were harder, with little external assistance being available. Practical Implications: The insights gained have practical implications for the support of creative graduate start-ups and for their on-going business or personal support as well as raising issues about the effectiveness of enterprise education and regional start-up support policy. Originality/Value: The longitudinal approach has brought new insights and indicates several areas where more research would be valuable, especially in dealing with the consequences of unsuccessful business ventures.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherISBEen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.isbe.org.uk/Hanage13en
dc.titleGreat Expectations to Hard Times: A longitudinal study of creative new venturesen
dc.typeMeetings and Proceedingsen
dc.contributor.departmentTeesside University. Social Futures Institute.en
dc.identifier.conferenceInstitute for Small Business & Entrepreneurship conferenceen
or.citation.harvardHanage, R. & Scott, J. M. (2013) 'Great Expectations to Hard Times: A longitudinal study of creative new ventures' presented at Institute for Small Business & Entrepreneurship conference, Nov 2013, Cardiff, November.en
All Items in TeesRep are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.