The Effect of Low-Volume Sprint Interval Training (SIT) on the Development and Subsequent Maintenance of Aerobic Fitness in Soccer Players

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/336629
Title:
The Effect of Low-Volume Sprint Interval Training (SIT) on the Development and Subsequent Maintenance of Aerobic Fitness in Soccer Players
Authors:
Macpherson, T. W. (Tom); Weston, M. (Matthew)
Affiliation:
Teesside University. Social Futures Institute
Citation:
Macpherson, T. W., Weston, M. (2014) 'The Effect of Low-Volume Sprint Interval Training (SIT) on the Development and Subsequent Maintenance of Aerobic Fitness in Soccer Players' International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance: In Press
Publisher:
Human Kinetics
Journal:
International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance
Issue Date:
2014
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/336629
DOI:
10.1123/ijspp.2014-0075
Additional Links:
http://journals.humankinetics.com/ijspp-in-press/ijspp-in-press/the-effect-of-low-volume-sprint-interval-training-sit-on-the-development-and-subsequent-maintenance-of-aerobic-fitness-in-soccer-players
Abstract:
To examine the effect of low-volume sprint interval training (SIT) on the development (part one) and subsequent maintenance (part two) of aerobic fitness in soccer players. Methods: In part one, 23 players from the same semi-professional team participated in a 2-week SIT intervention (SIT, n = 14, age 25 ± 4 y, weight 77 ± 8 kg; control, n = 9, age 27 ± 6 y, weight 72 ± 10 kg). The SIT group performed six training sessions of 4-6 maximal 30-s sprints, in replacement of regular aerobic training. The control group continued with their regular training. Following this 2-week intervention, the SIT group were allocated to either intervention (n = 7, one SIT session per week as replacement of regular aerobic training) or control (n = 7, regular aerobic training with no SIT sessions) for a 5-week period (part two). Pre and post measures were the YoYo intermittent recovery test level 1 (YYIRL1) and maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max). Results: In part one, the 2-week SIT intervention had a small beneficial effect on YYIRL1 (17%; 90% confidence limits ±11%), and VO2max (3.1%; ±5.0%), compared to control. In part two, one SIT session per week for 5 weeks had a small beneficial effect on VO2max (4.2%; ±3.0%), with an unclear effect on YYIRL1 (8%; ±16%). Conclusion: Two weeks of SIT elicits small improvements in soccer players’ high-intensity intermittent running performance and VO2max, therefore representing a worthwhile replacement of regular aerobic training. The effectiveness of SIT for maintaining SIT-induced improvements in high-intensity intermittent running requires further research.
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
15550265
Rights:
No publisher policy information available on http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo [Accessed: 04/12/2014]

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMacpherson, T. W. (Tom)en
dc.contributor.authorWeston, M. (Matthew)en
dc.date.accessioned2014-12-04T14:16:13Z-
dc.date.available2014-12-04T14:16:13Z-
dc.date.issued2014-
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance: In Pressen
dc.identifier.issn15550265-
dc.identifier.doi10.1123/ijspp.2014-0075-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10149/336629-
dc.description.abstractTo examine the effect of low-volume sprint interval training (SIT) on the development (part one) and subsequent maintenance (part two) of aerobic fitness in soccer players. Methods: In part one, 23 players from the same semi-professional team participated in a 2-week SIT intervention (SIT, n = 14, age 25 ± 4 y, weight 77 ± 8 kg; control, n = 9, age 27 ± 6 y, weight 72 ± 10 kg). The SIT group performed six training sessions of 4-6 maximal 30-s sprints, in replacement of regular aerobic training. The control group continued with their regular training. Following this 2-week intervention, the SIT group were allocated to either intervention (n = 7, one SIT session per week as replacement of regular aerobic training) or control (n = 7, regular aerobic training with no SIT sessions) for a 5-week period (part two). Pre and post measures were the YoYo intermittent recovery test level 1 (YYIRL1) and maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max). Results: In part one, the 2-week SIT intervention had a small beneficial effect on YYIRL1 (17%; 90% confidence limits ±11%), and VO2max (3.1%; ±5.0%), compared to control. In part two, one SIT session per week for 5 weeks had a small beneficial effect on VO2max (4.2%; ±3.0%), with an unclear effect on YYIRL1 (8%; ±16%). Conclusion: Two weeks of SIT elicits small improvements in soccer players’ high-intensity intermittent running performance and VO2max, therefore representing a worthwhile replacement of regular aerobic training. The effectiveness of SIT for maintaining SIT-induced improvements in high-intensity intermittent running requires further research.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherHuman Kineticsen
dc.relation.urlhttp://journals.humankinetics.com/ijspp-in-press/ijspp-in-press/the-effect-of-low-volume-sprint-interval-training-sit-on-the-development-and-subsequent-maintenance-of-aerobic-fitness-in-soccer-playersen
dc.rightsNo publisher policy information available on http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo [Accessed: 04/12/2014]en
dc.titleThe Effect of Low-Volume Sprint Interval Training (SIT) on the Development and Subsequent Maintenance of Aerobic Fitness in Soccer Playersen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentTeesside University. Social Futures Instituteen
dc.identifier.journalInternational Journal of Sports Physiology and Performanceen
or.citation.harvardMacpherson, T. W., Weston, M. (2014) 'The Effect of Low-Volume Sprint Interval Training (SIT) on the Development and Subsequent Maintenance of Aerobic Fitness in Soccer Players' International Journal of Sports Physiology and Performance: In Press-
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