Sensory integration and response to balance perturbation in overweight physically active individuals

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/338627
Title:
Sensory integration and response to balance perturbation in overweight physically active individuals
Authors:
Cheung, P. P. (Peggy); Azevedo, L. B. (Liane)
Affiliation:
Teesside University. Health and Social Care Institute.
Citation:
Cheung, P. P., Azevedo, L. B. (2015) 'Sensory integration and response to balance perturbation in overweight physically active individuals' Journal of Motor Behavior; Published Online 04/03/2015: DOI: 10.1080/00222895.2015.1007914
Publisher:
Taylor and Francis
Journal:
Journal of Motor Behavior
Issue Date:
4-Mar-2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/338627
DOI:
10.1080/00222895.2015.1007914
Abstract:
The purpose of this study was to compare sensory integration and response to balance perturbation between physically active normal weight and overweight adults. Physically active young adults were grouped into normal weight (N=45) or overweight (N=17) according to the WHO body mass index classification for Asian adults. Participants underwent two balance tests: sensory organization and motor control. Overweight participants presented marginally lower somatosensory score compared to normal weight participants. However, they scored significantly higher in response to balance perturbation. There was no difference in the onset of participants’ active response to balance perturbation. Physical activity might have contributed to improved muscle strength and improved the ability of overweight individuals to maintain balance.
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Keywords:
postural balance; BMI; overweight; physical activity; sensory feedback
ISSN:
0022-2895
Rights:
Following 12 month embargo author can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing). For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo [Accessed: 22/01/2015]

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorCheung, P. P. (Peggy)en
dc.contributor.authorAzevedo, L. B. (Liane)en
dc.date.accessioned2015-01-22T14:47:54Zen
dc.date.available2015-01-22T14:47:54Zen
dc.date.issued2015-03-04en
dc.identifier.issn0022-2895en
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/00222895.2015.1007914en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10149/338627en
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to compare sensory integration and response to balance perturbation between physically active normal weight and overweight adults. Physically active young adults were grouped into normal weight (N=45) or overweight (N=17) according to the WHO body mass index classification for Asian adults. Participants underwent two balance tests: sensory organization and motor control. Overweight participants presented marginally lower somatosensory score compared to normal weight participants. However, they scored significantly higher in response to balance perturbation. There was no difference in the onset of participants’ active response to balance perturbation. Physical activity might have contributed to improved muscle strength and improved the ability of overweight individuals to maintain balance.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherTaylor and Francisen
dc.rightsFollowing 12 month embargo author can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing). For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo [Accessed: 22/01/2015]en
dc.subjectpostural balanceen
dc.subjectBMIen
dc.subjectoverweighten
dc.subjectphysical activityen
dc.subjectsensory feedbacken
dc.titleSensory integration and response to balance perturbation in overweight physically active individualsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentTeesside University. Health and Social Care Institute.en
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Motor Behavioren
or.citation.harvardCheung, P. P., Azevedo, L. B. (2015) 'Sensory integration and response to balance perturbation in overweight physically active individuals' Journal of Motor Behavior; Published Online 04/03/2015: DOI: 10.1080/00222895.2015.1007914en
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