A qualitative exploration of people's experiences of Pain Neurophysiological Education for chronic pain: the importance of relevance for the individual

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/579472
Title:
A qualitative exploration of people's experiences of Pain Neurophysiological Education for chronic pain: the importance of relevance for the individual
Authors:
Robinson, V. (Victoria); King, R. (Richard); Ryan, C. G. (Cormac); Martin, D. J. (Denis)
Affiliation:
Teesside University. Health and Social Care Institute.
Citation:
Robinson, V., King, R., Ryan, C. G., Martin, D. J. (2016) 'A qualitative exploration of people's experiences of Pain Neurophysiological Education for chronic pain: the importance of relevance for the individual' Manual Therapy; 22: 56–61
Publisher:
Elsevier
Journal:
Manual Therapy
Issue Date:
4-Oct-2015 ; Apr-2016
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/579472
DOI:
10.1016/j.math.2015.10.001
Additional Links:
http://www.manualtherapyjournal.com/article/S1356-689X%2815%2900191-5/abstract
Abstract:
Pain neurophysiology education (PNE) is a distinct form of patient education in pain management. The aims of this study were to explore the experience of PNE for people with chronic pain and to gain insight into their understanding of their pain after PNE. This was a qualitative study, based on Interpretive Phenomenology Analysis, using individual semi-structured interviews to collect data. We recruited a purposive sample of 10 adults with chronic musculoskeletal pain (men and women; mean age 48 years; with a mean pain duration of 9 years) who had recently completed PNE delivered as a single two-hour group session. The interview transcripts were analysed for emerging themes. We identified three themes: perceived relevance for the individual participant; perceived benefits for the individual participant; and evidence of reconceptualisation. An interlinking narrative was the importance of relevance. Eight participants viewed the session as relevant and reported benefits ranging from a better understanding of pain, improved ability to cope with the pain, and some suggested improved levels of physical activity. Four of these participants showed evidence of reconceptualisation, which we describe as partial and patchy. Two participants reported no benefit and did not perceive the material delivered within PNE to be relevant to themselves. Relevance to the individual needs of a person with chronic pain may be a key factor in the success of PNE, and this is a particular challenge when it is delivered in a group situation.
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Keywords:
Chronic musculoskeletal pain; Patient education; Qualitative
ISSN:
1356-689X
Rights:
Following 12 month embargo author can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing). For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo [Accessed: 08/10/2015]

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorRobinson, V. (Victoria)en
dc.contributor.authorKing, R. (Richard)en
dc.contributor.authorRyan, C. G. (Cormac)en
dc.contributor.authorMartin, D. J. (Denis)en
dc.date.accessioned2015-10-08T11:36:25Zen
dc.date.available2015-10-08T11:36:25Zen
dc.date.issued2015-10-04en
dc.date.issued2016-04en
dc.identifier.citationManual Therapy; Published online Oct 20 2015: 10.1016/j.math.2015.10.001en
dc.identifier.issn1356-689Xen
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.math.2015.10.001en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10149/579472en
dc.description.abstractPain neurophysiology education (PNE) is a distinct form of patient education in pain management. The aims of this study were to explore the experience of PNE for people with chronic pain and to gain insight into their understanding of their pain after PNE. This was a qualitative study, based on Interpretive Phenomenology Analysis, using individual semi-structured interviews to collect data. We recruited a purposive sample of 10 adults with chronic musculoskeletal pain (men and women; mean age 48 years; with a mean pain duration of 9 years) who had recently completed PNE delivered as a single two-hour group session. The interview transcripts were analysed for emerging themes. We identified three themes: perceived relevance for the individual participant; perceived benefits for the individual participant; and evidence of reconceptualisation. An interlinking narrative was the importance of relevance. Eight participants viewed the session as relevant and reported benefits ranging from a better understanding of pain, improved ability to cope with the pain, and some suggested improved levels of physical activity. Four of these participants showed evidence of reconceptualisation, which we describe as partial and patchy. Two participants reported no benefit and did not perceive the material delivered within PNE to be relevant to themselves. Relevance to the individual needs of a person with chronic pain may be a key factor in the success of PNE, and this is a particular challenge when it is delivered in a group situation.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherElsevieren
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.manualtherapyjournal.com/article/S1356-689X%2815%2900191-5/abstracten
dc.rightsFollowing 12 month embargo author can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing). For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo [Accessed: 08/10/2015]en
dc.subjectChronic musculoskeletal painen
dc.subjectPatient educationen
dc.subjectQualitativeen
dc.titleA qualitative exploration of people's experiences of Pain Neurophysiological Education for chronic pain: the importance of relevance for the individualen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentTeesside University. Health and Social Care Institute.en
dc.identifier.journalManual Therapyen
or.citation.harvardRobinson, V., King, R., Ryan, C. G., Martin, D. J. (2016) 'A qualitative exploration of people's experiences of Pain Neurophysiological Education for chronic pain: the importance of relevance for the individual' Manual Therapy; 22: 56–61en
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