Can compassionate healthcare be measured? The Schwartz Center Compassionate Care Scale™

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/581617
Title:
Can compassionate healthcare be measured? The Schwartz Center Compassionate Care Scale™
Authors:
Lown, B. A. (Beth); Muncer, S. J. (Steven); Chadwick, R. (Raymond)
Affiliation:
Teesside University, Health and Social Care Institute.
Citation:
Lown, B. A.; Muncer, S. J.; Chadwick, R. (2015) 'Can compassionate healthcare be measured? The Schwartz Center Compassionate Care Scale™' Patient Education and Counseling; 98(8) : 1005-1010
Publisher:
Elsevier
Journal:
Patient Education and Counseling
Issue Date:
Aug-2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/581617
DOI:
10.1016/j.pec.2015.03.019
Additional Links:
http://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0738399115001342
Abstract:
Abstract Objective Assess psychometric characteristics of an instrument to measure compassionate healthcare. Methods We used Cronbach’s alpha to examine scale reliability, exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis to examine scale structure, and Mokken analysis to determine if items belonged to a unidimensional scale. Results Results indicated that both sets of items had strong reliability when used to rate individual physicians (Cronbach’s α = .97 and .95). A one factor model was a good fit to both sets of items (χ2(20) 35.23, p > .01, Tucker Lewis Index (TLI) = .98, Comparative Fit Index (CFI) = .99, Root Mean Square Error of Approximation (RMSEA) = .04, and χ2(20) 42.28, p > .01, TLI = .96, CFI = .97, RMSEA = .05. Mokken analysis also supported a unidimensional scale. Both sets of items correlated strongly with an overall measure of patient satisfaction with physicians. Conclusions A unidimensional patient-rated scale reliably measured hospital physicians’ compassion and correlated significantly with patient satisfaction. Additional testing is required to assess its validity and reliability for other healthcare professionals and clinical settings. Practice Implications Measurement of compassionate healthcare is important to patients and healthcare professionals and should be included in research, educational assessment, and healthcare quality performance improvement programs
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Keywords:
compassion; compassionate healthcare; patient-centered; empathy; physician patient relations; quality improvement; patient satisfaction; measurement
ISSN:
07383991
Rights:
Author can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing) following an embargo period of 12 months. For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorLown, B. A. (Beth)en
dc.contributor.authorMuncer, S. J. (Steven)en
dc.contributor.authorChadwick, R. (Raymond)en
dc.date.accessioned2015-11-03T16:04:46Zen
dc.date.available2015-11-03T16:04:46Zen
dc.date.issued2015-08en
dc.identifier.citationPatient Education and Counseling; 98(8) : 1005-1010en
dc.identifier.issn07383991en
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.pec.2015.03.019en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10149/581617en
dc.description.abstractAbstract Objective Assess psychometric characteristics of an instrument to measure compassionate healthcare. Methods We used Cronbach’s alpha to examine scale reliability, exploratory and confirmatory factor analysis to examine scale structure, and Mokken analysis to determine if items belonged to a unidimensional scale. Results Results indicated that both sets of items had strong reliability when used to rate individual physicians (Cronbach’s α = .97 and .95). A one factor model was a good fit to both sets of items (χ2(20) 35.23, p > .01, Tucker Lewis Index (TLI) = .98, Comparative Fit Index (CFI) = .99, Root Mean Square Error of Approximation (RMSEA) = .04, and χ2(20) 42.28, p > .01, TLI = .96, CFI = .97, RMSEA = .05. Mokken analysis also supported a unidimensional scale. Both sets of items correlated strongly with an overall measure of patient satisfaction with physicians. Conclusions A unidimensional patient-rated scale reliably measured hospital physicians’ compassion and correlated significantly with patient satisfaction. Additional testing is required to assess its validity and reliability for other healthcare professionals and clinical settings. Practice Implications Measurement of compassionate healthcare is important to patients and healthcare professionals and should be included in research, educational assessment, and healthcare quality performance improvement programsen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherElsevieren
dc.relation.urlhttp://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0738399115001342en
dc.rightsAuthor can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing) following an embargo period of 12 months. For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeoen
dc.subjectcompassionen
dc.subjectcompassionate healthcareen
dc.subjectpatient-centereden
dc.subjectempathyen
dc.subjectphysician patient relationsen
dc.subjectquality improvementen
dc.subjectpatient satisfactionen
dc.subjectmeasurementen
dc.titleCan compassionate healthcare be measured? The Schwartz Center Compassionate Care Scale™en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentTeesside University, Health and Social Care Institute.en
dc.identifier.journalPatient Education and Counselingen
or.citation.harvardLown, B. A.; Muncer, S. J.; Chadwick, R. (2015) 'Can compassionate healthcare be measured? The Schwartz Center Compassionate Care Scale™' Patient Education and Counseling; 98(8) : 1005-1010en
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