High-intensity interval exercise training for public health: a big HIT or shall we HIT it on the head?

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/581696
Title:
High-intensity interval exercise training for public health: a big HIT or shall we HIT it on the head?
Authors:
Biddle, S. J. H. (Stuart); Batterham, A. M. (Alan)
Affiliation:
Teesside University. Health and Social Care Institute.
Citation:
Biddle, S. J. H., Batterham, A. M. (2015) 'High-intensity interval exercise training for public health: a big HIT or shall we HIT it on the head?' International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity; 12 (1)
Publisher:
BioMed Central
Journal:
International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity
Issue Date:
18-Jul-2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/581696
DOI:
10.1186/s12966-015-0254-9
Additional Links:
http://www.ijbnpa.org/content/12/1/95
Abstract:
The efficacy of high-intensity interval training for a broad spectrum of cardio-metabolic health outcomes is not in question. Rather, the effectiveness of this form of exercise is at stake. In this paper we debate the issues concerning the likely success or failure of high-intensity interval training interventions for population-level health promotion. Discussion: Biddle maintains that high-intensity interval training cannot be a viable public health strategy as it will not be adopted or maintained by many people. This conclusion is based on an analysis of perceptions of competence, the psychologically aversive nature of high-intensity exercise, the affective component of attitudes, the less conscious elements of motivated behaviour that reflect our likes and dislikes, and analysis using the RE-AIM framework. Batterham argues that this appraisal is based on a constrained and outmoded definition of high-intensity interval training and that truly practical and scalable protocols have been - and continue to be - developed. He contends that the purported displeasure associated with this type of exercise has been overstated. Biddle suggests that the way forward is to help the least active become more active rather than the already active to do more. Batterham claims that traditional physical activity promotion has been a spectacular failure. He proposes that, within an evolutionary health promotion framework, high-intensity interval training could be a successful population strategy for producing rapid physiological adaptations benefiting public health, independent of changes in total physical activity energy expenditure. Summary: Biddle recommends that we focus our attention elsewhere if we want population-level gains in physical activity impacting public health. His conclusion is based on his belief that high-intensity interval training interventions will have limited reach, effectiveness, and adoption, and poor implementation and maintenance. In contrast, Batterham maintains that there is genuine potential for scalable, enjoyable high-intensity interval exercise interventions to contribute substantially to addressing areas of public health priority, including prevention and treatment of Type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Keywords:
exercise; physical activity; public health; Psychological affect; Enjoyment; barriers
ISSN:
1479-5868
Rights:
Author can archive publisher's version/PDF. For full information see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo [Accessed: 04/11/2015]

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBiddle, S. J. H. (Stuart)en
dc.contributor.authorBatterham, A. M. (Alan)en
dc.date.accessioned2015-11-04T10:56:26Zen
dc.date.available2015-11-04T10:56:26Zen
dc.date.issued2015-07-18en
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity; 12 (1)en
dc.identifier.issn1479-5868en
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/s12966-015-0254-9en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10149/581696en
dc.description.abstractThe efficacy of high-intensity interval training for a broad spectrum of cardio-metabolic health outcomes is not in question. Rather, the effectiveness of this form of exercise is at stake. In this paper we debate the issues concerning the likely success or failure of high-intensity interval training interventions for population-level health promotion. Discussion: Biddle maintains that high-intensity interval training cannot be a viable public health strategy as it will not be adopted or maintained by many people. This conclusion is based on an analysis of perceptions of competence, the psychologically aversive nature of high-intensity exercise, the affective component of attitudes, the less conscious elements of motivated behaviour that reflect our likes and dislikes, and analysis using the RE-AIM framework. Batterham argues that this appraisal is based on a constrained and outmoded definition of high-intensity interval training and that truly practical and scalable protocols have been - and continue to be - developed. He contends that the purported displeasure associated with this type of exercise has been overstated. Biddle suggests that the way forward is to help the least active become more active rather than the already active to do more. Batterham claims that traditional physical activity promotion has been a spectacular failure. He proposes that, within an evolutionary health promotion framework, high-intensity interval training could be a successful population strategy for producing rapid physiological adaptations benefiting public health, independent of changes in total physical activity energy expenditure. Summary: Biddle recommends that we focus our attention elsewhere if we want population-level gains in physical activity impacting public health. His conclusion is based on his belief that high-intensity interval training interventions will have limited reach, effectiveness, and adoption, and poor implementation and maintenance. In contrast, Batterham maintains that there is genuine potential for scalable, enjoyable high-intensity interval exercise interventions to contribute substantially to addressing areas of public health priority, including prevention and treatment of Type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular diseaseen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBioMed Centralen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ijbnpa.org/content/12/1/95en
dc.rightsAuthor can archive publisher's version/PDF. For full information see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo [Accessed: 04/11/2015]en
dc.subjectexerciseen
dc.subjectphysical activityen
dc.subjectpublic healthen
dc.subjectPsychological affecten
dc.subjectEnjoymenten
dc.subjectbarriersen
dc.titleHigh-intensity interval exercise training for public health: a big HIT or shall we HIT it on the head?en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentTeesside University. Health and Social Care Institute.en
dc.identifier.journalInternational Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activityen
or.citation.harvardBiddle, S. J. H., Batterham, A. M. (2015) 'High-intensity interval exercise training for public health: a big HIT or shall we HIT it on the head?' International Journal of Behavioral Nutrition and Physical Activity; 12 (1)en
dc.date.accepted2015-06-29en
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