Shifts in soil biodiversity—A forensic comparison between Sus scrofa domesticus and vegetation decomposition

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/581789
Title:
Shifts in soil biodiversity—A forensic comparison between Sus scrofa domesticus and vegetation decomposition
Authors:
Olakanye, A. O. (Ayodeji); Thompson, T. J. U. (Tim); Ralebitso-Senior, T. K. (Theresia Komang)
Affiliation:
Teesside University. Technology Futures Institute.
Citation:
Olakanye, A. O., Thompson, T. J. U., Ralebitso-Senior, T. K. (2015) 'Shifts in soil biodiversity—A forensic comparison between Sus scrofa domesticus and vegetation decomposition' Science & Justice; 55 (6): 402–407
Publisher:
Elsevier
Journal:
Science & Justice
Issue Date:
Aug-2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/581789
DOI:
10.1016/j.scijus.2015.07.004
Additional Links:
http://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1355030615000957
Abstract:
In a forensic context, microbial-mediated cadaver decomposition and nutrient recycling cannot be overlooked. As a result, forensic ecogenomics research has intensified to gain a better understanding of cadaver/soil ecology interactions as a powerful potential tool for forensic practitioners. For this study, domestic pig (Sus scrofa domesticus) (4 g) and grass (Agrostis/Festuca spp) cuttings (4 g) were buried (July 2013 to July 2014) in sandy clay loam (80 g) triplicates in sealed microcosms (127 ml; 50 × 70 cm) with parallel soil only controls. The effects of the two carbon sources were determined by monitoring key environmental factors and changes in soil bacterial (16S rRNA gene) and fungal (18S rRNA gene) biodiversity. Soil pH changes showed statistically significant differences (p < 0.05) between the treatments. The measured ecological diversity indices (Shannon–Wiener, HꞋ; Simpson, D; and richness, S) of the 16S rRNA and 18S rRNA gene profiles also revealed differences between the treatments, with bacterial and fungal community dominance recorded in the presence of S. scrofa domesticus and grass trimming decomposition, respectively. In contrast, no statistically significant difference in evenness (p > 0.05) was observed between the treatments.
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
13550306
Rights:
Following 12 month embargo author can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing). For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo [Accessed: 05/11/2015]

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorOlakanye, A. O. (Ayodeji)en
dc.contributor.authorThompson, T. J. U. (Tim)en
dc.contributor.authorRalebitso-Senior, T. K. (Theresia Komang)en
dc.date.accessioned2015-11-05T11:31:53Zen
dc.date.available2015-11-05T11:31:53Zen
dc.date.issued2015-08en
dc.identifier.citationScience & Justice; 55 (6): 402–407en
dc.identifier.issn13550306en
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.scijus.2015.07.004en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10149/581789en
dc.description.abstractIn a forensic context, microbial-mediated cadaver decomposition and nutrient recycling cannot be overlooked. As a result, forensic ecogenomics research has intensified to gain a better understanding of cadaver/soil ecology interactions as a powerful potential tool for forensic practitioners. For this study, domestic pig (Sus scrofa domesticus) (4 g) and grass (Agrostis/Festuca spp) cuttings (4 g) were buried (July 2013 to July 2014) in sandy clay loam (80 g) triplicates in sealed microcosms (127 ml; 50 × 70 cm) with parallel soil only controls. The effects of the two carbon sources were determined by monitoring key environmental factors and changes in soil bacterial (16S rRNA gene) and fungal (18S rRNA gene) biodiversity. Soil pH changes showed statistically significant differences (p < 0.05) between the treatments. The measured ecological diversity indices (Shannon–Wiener, HꞋ; Simpson, D; and richness, S) of the 16S rRNA and 18S rRNA gene profiles also revealed differences between the treatments, with bacterial and fungal community dominance recorded in the presence of S. scrofa domesticus and grass trimming decomposition, respectively. In contrast, no statistically significant difference in evenness (p > 0.05) was observed between the treatments.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherElsevieren
dc.relation.urlhttp://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1355030615000957en
dc.rightsFollowing 12 month embargo author can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing). For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo [Accessed: 05/11/2015]en
dc.titleShifts in soil biodiversity—A forensic comparison between Sus scrofa domesticus and vegetation decompositionen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentTeesside University. Technology Futures Institute.en
dc.identifier.journalScience & Justiceen
or.citation.harvardOlakanye, A. O., Thompson, T. J. U., Ralebitso-Senior, T. K. (2015) 'Shifts in soil biodiversity—A forensic comparison between Sus scrofa domesticus and vegetation decomposition' Science & Justice; 55 (6): 402–407en
dc.date.accepted2015-07-06en
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