Microbial Ecogenomics and Forensic Archaeology: New Methods for Investigating Clandestine Gravesites

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/582398
Title:
Microbial Ecogenomics and Forensic Archaeology: New Methods for Investigating Clandestine Gravesites
Authors:
Ralebitso-Senior, T. K. (Theresia Komang); Thompson, T. J. U. (Tim); Carney, H. (Helen)
Affiliation:
Teesside University. Technology Futures Institute
Citation:
Ralebitso-Senior, T. K., Thompson, T. J. U., Carney, H. E., (2016) "Microbial Ecogenomics and Forensic Archaeology: New Methods for Investigating Clandestine Gravesites", Human Remains and Violence: An Interdisciplinary Journal; 2 (1): 41-57
Publisher:
Manchester University Press
Journal:
Human Remains and Violence: An Interdisciplinary Journal
Issue Date:
2016
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/582398
Abstract:
In the mid-1990s, the crime scene toolkit was revolutionised by the introduction of DNA-based analyses such as the polymerase chain reaction, low copy number DNA analysis, short-tandem repeat typing, pulse-field gel electrophoresis and variable number tandem repeat. Since then, methodological advances in other disciplines, especially molecular microbial ecology, can now be adapted for cutting-edge applications in forensic contexts. Despite several studies and discussions, there is, however, currently very little evidence of these techniques’ adoption at the contemporary crime scene. Consequently, this article discusses some of the popular ‘omics’ and their current and potential exploitations in the ‘forensic ecogenomics’ of body decomposition in a crime scene. Thus, together with published supportive findings and discourse, knowledge gaps are identified. These then justify the need for more comprehensive, directed, concerted and global research towards state-of-the-art microecophysiology method application and/or adaptation for subsequent successful exploitations in this additional context of microbial forensics.
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Keywords:
forensic science; crime scene; molecular microbial ecology; ecogenomics
EISSN:
2054-2240
Rights:
Content published under the terms of Creative Commons Licences which allows copyright to remain with authors and requires full attribution to accompany all reuse and dissemination. For full details see http://www.manchesteruniversitypress.co.uk/open-access/ [Accessed: 30/03/2016]

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorRalebitso-Senior, T. K. (Theresia Komang)en
dc.contributor.authorThompson, T. J. U. (Tim)en
dc.contributor.authorCarney, H. (Helen)en
dc.date.accessioned2015-11-19T11:05:59Zen
dc.date.available2015-11-19T11:05:59Zen
dc.date.issued2016en
dc.identifier.citationHuman Remains and Violence: An Interdisciplinary Journal; 2 (1): 41-57en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10149/582398en
dc.description.abstractIn the mid-1990s, the crime scene toolkit was revolutionised by the introduction of DNA-based analyses such as the polymerase chain reaction, low copy number DNA analysis, short-tandem repeat typing, pulse-field gel electrophoresis and variable number tandem repeat. Since then, methodological advances in other disciplines, especially molecular microbial ecology, can now be adapted for cutting-edge applications in forensic contexts. Despite several studies and discussions, there is, however, currently very little evidence of these techniques’ adoption at the contemporary crime scene. Consequently, this article discusses some of the popular ‘omics’ and their current and potential exploitations in the ‘forensic ecogenomics’ of body decomposition in a crime scene. Thus, together with published supportive findings and discourse, knowledge gaps are identified. These then justify the need for more comprehensive, directed, concerted and global research towards state-of-the-art microecophysiology method application and/or adaptation for subsequent successful exploitations in this additional context of microbial forensics.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherManchester University Pressen
dc.rightsContent published under the terms of Creative Commons Licences which allows copyright to remain with authors and requires full attribution to accompany all reuse and dissemination. For full details see http://www.manchesteruniversitypress.co.uk/open-access/ [Accessed: 30/03/2016]en
dc.subjectforensic scienceen
dc.subjectcrime sceneen
dc.subjectmolecular microbial ecologyen
dc.subjectecogenomicsen
dc.titleMicrobial Ecogenomics and Forensic Archaeology: New Methods for Investigating Clandestine Gravesitesen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.eissn2054-2240en
dc.contributor.departmentTeesside University. Technology Futures Instituteen
dc.identifier.journalHuman Remains and Violence: An Interdisciplinary Journalen
or.citation.harvardRalebitso-Senior, T. K., Thompson, T. J. U., Carney, H. E., (2016) "Microbial Ecogenomics and Forensic Archaeology: New Methods for Investigating Clandestine Gravesites", Human Remains and Violence: An Interdisciplinary Journal; 2 (1): 41-57en
dc.date.accepted2015-04-08en
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