Musculoskeletal injuries in British Army recruits: a prospective study of diagnosis-specific incidence and rehabilitation times

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/582424
Title:
Musculoskeletal injuries in British Army recruits: a prospective study of diagnosis-specific incidence and rehabilitation times
Authors:
Sharma, J. (Jagannath); Greeves, J. P. (Julie); Byers, M. (Mark); Bennett, A. N. (Alexander); Spears, I. R. (Iain)
Affiliation:
Teesside University, Social Futures Institute.
Citation:
Sharma, J. (Jagannath); Greeves, J. P. (Julie); Byers, M. (Mark); Bennett, A. N. (Alexander); Spears, I. R. (Iain) (2015) 'Musculoskeletal injuries in British Army recruits: a prospective study of diagnosis-specific incidence and rehabilitation times' BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders; 16 (106)
Publisher:
Springer Verlag
Journal:
BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders
Issue Date:
4-May-2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/582424
DOI:
10.1186/s12891-015-0558-6
Additional Links:
http://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2474/16/106
Abstract:
Background Musculoskeletal injuries during initial military training are a significant medical problem facing military organisations globally. In order to develop an injury management programme, this study aims to quantify the incidence and rehabilitation times for injury specific diagnoses. Methods This was a prospective follow-up study of musculoskeletal injuries in 6608 British Army recruits during a 26-week initial military training programme over a 2-year period. Incidence and rehabilitation times for injury specific diagnoses were recorded and analysed. Results During the study period the overall incidence of musculoskeletal injuries was 48.6%, and the most common diagnosis was iliotibial band syndrome (6.2%). A significant proportion of the injuries occurred during the first 11 weeks of the programme. The longest rehabilitation times were for stress fractures of the femur, calcaneus and tibia (116 ± 17 days, 92 ± 12 days, and 85 ± 11 days, respectively). The combination of high incidence and lengthy rehabilitation indicates that medial tibial stress syndrome had the greatest impact on training, accounting for almost 20% of all days spent in rehabilitation. Conclusion When setting prevention priorities consideration should be given to both the incidence of specific injury diagnoses and their associated time to recovery.
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Keywords:
Military training; Training load; Overuse injury; Rehabilitation
ISSN:
1471-2474
Rights:
Author can archive publisher's version/PDF. For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo [Accessed 20/11/2015]

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorSharma, J. (Jagannath)en
dc.contributor.authorGreeves, J. P. (Julie)en
dc.contributor.authorByers, M. (Mark)en
dc.contributor.authorBennett, A. N. (Alexander)en
dc.contributor.authorSpears, I. R. (Iain)en
dc.date.accessioned2015-11-20T11:46:56Zen
dc.date.available2015-11-20T11:46:56Zen
dc.date.issued2015-05-04en
dc.identifier.citationBMC Musculoskeletal Disorders; 16 (106)en
dc.identifier.issn1471-2474en
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/s12891-015-0558-6en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10149/582424en
dc.description.abstractBackground Musculoskeletal injuries during initial military training are a significant medical problem facing military organisations globally. In order to develop an injury management programme, this study aims to quantify the incidence and rehabilitation times for injury specific diagnoses. Methods This was a prospective follow-up study of musculoskeletal injuries in 6608 British Army recruits during a 26-week initial military training programme over a 2-year period. Incidence and rehabilitation times for injury specific diagnoses were recorded and analysed. Results During the study period the overall incidence of musculoskeletal injuries was 48.6%, and the most common diagnosis was iliotibial band syndrome (6.2%). A significant proportion of the injuries occurred during the first 11 weeks of the programme. The longest rehabilitation times were for stress fractures of the femur, calcaneus and tibia (116 ± 17 days, 92 ± 12 days, and 85 ± 11 days, respectively). The combination of high incidence and lengthy rehabilitation indicates that medial tibial stress syndrome had the greatest impact on training, accounting for almost 20% of all days spent in rehabilitation. Conclusion When setting prevention priorities consideration should be given to both the incidence of specific injury diagnoses and their associated time to recovery.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSpringer Verlagen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.biomedcentral.com/1471-2474/16/106en
dc.rightsAuthor can archive publisher's version/PDF. For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo [Accessed 20/11/2015]en
dc.subjectMilitary trainingen
dc.subjectTraining loaden
dc.subjectOveruse injuryen
dc.subjectRehabilitationen
dc.titleMusculoskeletal injuries in British Army recruits: a prospective study of diagnosis-specific incidence and rehabilitation timesen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentTeesside University, Social Futures Institute.en
dc.identifier.journalBMC Musculoskeletal Disordersen
or.citation.harvardSharma, J. (Jagannath); Greeves, J. P. (Julie); Byers, M. (Mark); Bennett, A. N. (Alexander); Spears, I. R. (Iain) (2015) 'Musculoskeletal injuries in British Army recruits: a prospective study of diagnosis-specific incidence and rehabilitation times' BMC Musculoskeletal Disorders; 16 (106)en
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