Ultrasound assessment of lower limb muscle mass in response to resistance training in COPD.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/582630
Title:
Ultrasound assessment of lower limb muscle mass in response to resistance training in COPD.
Authors:
Menon, M. K. (Manoj); Houchen, L. (Linzy); Harrison, S. L. (Samantha); Singh, S.J. (Sally); Morgan, M. D. (Michael); Steiner, M. C. (Michael)
Affiliation:
Teesside University. Health and Social Care Institute.
Citation:
Menon, M.K, Houchen, L, Harrison, S.L, Singh, S.J, Morgan, M.D and Steiner, M.C. (2013) 'Ultrasound Assessment of Lower Limb Muscle Mass in Response to Resistance Training in COPD' Respiratory Research; 13: 119
Publisher:
BioMed Central
Journal:
Respiratory research
Issue Date:
2012
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/582630
DOI:
10.1186/1465-9921-13-119
PubMed ID:
23273255
Abstract:
Quantifying the improvements in lower limb or quadriceps muscle mass following resistance training (RT), is an important outcome measure in COPD. Ultrasound is a portable, radiation free imaging technique that can measure the size of superficial muscles belonging to the quadriceps group such as the rectus femoris, but has not been previously used in COPD patients following RT. We compared the responsiveness of ultrasound derived measures of quadriceps mass against dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DEXA), in patients with COPD and healthy controls following a programme of high intensity knee extensor RT.
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Keywords:
Aged; Female; Humans; Imaging, Three-Dimensional; Knee Joint; Male; Muscle, Skeletal; Organ Size; Pulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructive; Resistance Training; Treatment Outcome
ISSN:
1465-993X
Rights:
Author can archive publisher's version/PDF, Creative Commons Attribution License. For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo [Accessed: 24/11/2015]

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMenon, M. K. (Manoj)en
dc.contributor.authorHouchen, L. (Linzy)en
dc.contributor.authorHarrison, S. L. (Samantha)en
dc.contributor.authorSingh, S.J. (Sally)en
dc.contributor.authorMorgan, M. D. (Michael)en
dc.contributor.authorSteiner, M. C. (Michael)en
dc.date.accessioned2015-11-24T16:51:25Zen
dc.date.available2015-11-24T16:51:25Zen
dc.date.issued2012en
dc.identifier.citationRespiratory research; 13:119en
dc.identifier.issn1465-993Xen
dc.identifier.pmid23273255en
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1465-9921-13-119en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10149/582630en
dc.description.abstractQuantifying the improvements in lower limb or quadriceps muscle mass following resistance training (RT), is an important outcome measure in COPD. Ultrasound is a portable, radiation free imaging technique that can measure the size of superficial muscles belonging to the quadriceps group such as the rectus femoris, but has not been previously used in COPD patients following RT. We compared the responsiveness of ultrasound derived measures of quadriceps mass against dual energy x-ray absorptiometry (DEXA), in patients with COPD and healthy controls following a programme of high intensity knee extensor RT.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBioMed Centralen
dc.rightsAuthor can archive publisher's version/PDF, Creative Commons Attribution License. For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo [Accessed: 24/11/2015]en
dc.subjectAgeden
dc.subjectFemaleen
dc.subjectHumansen
dc.subjectImaging, Three-Dimensionalen
dc.subjectKnee Jointen
dc.subjectMaleen
dc.subjectMuscle, Skeletalen
dc.subjectOrgan Sizeen
dc.subjectPulmonary Disease, Chronic Obstructiveen
dc.subjectResistance Trainingen
dc.subjectTreatment Outcomeen
dc.titleUltrasound assessment of lower limb muscle mass in response to resistance training in COPD.en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentTeesside University. Health and Social Care Institute.en
dc.identifier.journalRespiratory researchen
or.citation.harvardMenon, M.K, Houchen, L, Harrison, S.L, Singh, S.J, Morgan, M.D and Steiner, M.C. (2013) 'Ultrasound Assessment of Lower Limb Muscle Mass in Response to Resistance Training in COPD' Respiratory Research; 13: 119en

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