Capturing Public Opinion on Public Health Topics: A Comparison of Experiences from a Systematic Review, Focus Group Study, and Analysis of Online, User-Generated Content

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/582677
Title:
Capturing Public Opinion on Public Health Topics: A Comparison of Experiences from a Systematic Review, Focus Group Study, and Analysis of Online, User-Generated Content
Authors:
Giles, E. L. (Emma) ( 0000-0002-2166-3300 ) ; Adams, J. M. (Jean)
Affiliation:
Teesside University. Health and Social Care Institute.
Citation:
Giles, E. L., Adams, J. M. (2015) 'Capturing Public Opinion on Public Health Topics: A Comparison of Experiences from a Systematic Review, Focus Group Study, and Analysis of Online, User-Generated Content' Frontiers in Public Health; 3:200. doi: 10.3389/fpubh.2015.00200
Publisher:
Frontiers
Journal:
Frontiers in Public Health
Issue Date:
24-Aug-2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/582677
DOI:
10.3389/fpubh.2015.00200
Additional Links:
http://journal.frontiersin.org/Article/10.3389/fpubh.2015.00200/abstract
Abstract:
Background: Capturing public opinion toward public health topics is important to ensure that services, policy, and research are aligned with the beliefs and priorities of the general public. A number of approaches can be used to capture public opinion. Methods: We are conducting a program of work on the effectiveness and acceptability of health promoting financial incentive interventions. We have captured public opinion on financial incentive interventions using three methods: a systematic review, focus group study, and analysis of online user-generated comments to news media reports. In this short editorial-style piece, we compare and contrast our experiences with these three methods. Results: Each of these methods had their advantages and disadvantages. Advantages include tailoring of the research question for systematic reviews, probing of answers during focus groups, and the ability to aggregate a large data set using online user-generated content. However, disadvantages include needing to update systematic reviews, participants conforming to a dominant perspective in focus groups, and being unable to collect respondent characteristics during analysis of user-generated online content. That said, analysis of user-generated online content offers additional time and resource advantages, and we found it elicited similar findings to those obtained via more traditional methods, such as systematic reviews and focus groups. Conclusion: A number of methods for capturing public opinions on public health topics are available. Public health researchers, policy makers, and practitioners should choose methods appropriate to their aims. Analysis of user-generated online content, especially in the context of news media reports, may be a quicker and cheaper alternative to more traditional methods, without compromising on the breadth of opinions captured.
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
2296-2565
Rights:
Author can archive publisher's version/PDF. Creative Commons Attribution License. This Document is Protected by copyright and was first published by Frontiers. All rights reserved. it is reproduced with permission. For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo [Accessed:25/11/2015]

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorGiles, E. L. (Emma)en
dc.contributor.authorAdams, J. M. (Jean)en
dc.date.accessioned2015-11-25T12:09:14Zen
dc.date.available2015-11-25T12:09:14Zen
dc.date.issued2015-08-24en
dc.identifier.citationFrontiers in Public Health; 3:200. doi: 10.3389/fpubh.2015.00200en
dc.identifier.issn2296-2565en
dc.identifier.doi10.3389/fpubh.2015.00200en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10149/582677en
dc.description.abstractBackground: Capturing public opinion toward public health topics is important to ensure that services, policy, and research are aligned with the beliefs and priorities of the general public. A number of approaches can be used to capture public opinion. Methods: We are conducting a program of work on the effectiveness and acceptability of health promoting financial incentive interventions. We have captured public opinion on financial incentive interventions using three methods: a systematic review, focus group study, and analysis of online user-generated comments to news media reports. In this short editorial-style piece, we compare and contrast our experiences with these three methods. Results: Each of these methods had their advantages and disadvantages. Advantages include tailoring of the research question for systematic reviews, probing of answers during focus groups, and the ability to aggregate a large data set using online user-generated content. However, disadvantages include needing to update systematic reviews, participants conforming to a dominant perspective in focus groups, and being unable to collect respondent characteristics during analysis of user-generated online content. That said, analysis of user-generated online content offers additional time and resource advantages, and we found it elicited similar findings to those obtained via more traditional methods, such as systematic reviews and focus groups. Conclusion: A number of methods for capturing public opinions on public health topics are available. Public health researchers, policy makers, and practitioners should choose methods appropriate to their aims. Analysis of user-generated online content, especially in the context of news media reports, may be a quicker and cheaper alternative to more traditional methods, without compromising on the breadth of opinions captured.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherFrontiersen
dc.relation.urlhttp://journal.frontiersin.org/Article/10.3389/fpubh.2015.00200/abstracten
dc.rightsAuthor can archive publisher's version/PDF. Creative Commons Attribution License. This Document is Protected by copyright and was first published by Frontiers. All rights reserved. it is reproduced with permission. For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo [Accessed:25/11/2015]en
dc.titleCapturing Public Opinion on Public Health Topics: A Comparison of Experiences from a Systematic Review, Focus Group Study, and Analysis of Online, User-Generated Contenten
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentTeesside University. Health and Social Care Institute.en
dc.identifier.journalFrontiers in Public Healthen
or.citation.harvardGiles, E. L., Adams, J. M. (2015) 'Capturing Public Opinion on Public Health Topics: A Comparison of Experiences from a Systematic Review, Focus Group Study, and Analysis of Online, User-Generated Content' Frontiers in Public Health; 3:200. doi: 10.3389/fpubh.2015.00200en
dc.date.accepted2015-08-05en
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