Narrative Form and the British Television Studio 1955–1963

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/583067
Title:
Narrative Form and the British Television Studio 1955–1963
Authors:
Lamb, Ben
Affiliation:
Teesside University. Institute of Design Culture and the Arts
Citation:
Lamb, Ben 'Narrative Form and the British Television Studio 1955–1963' Historical Journal of Film, Radio and Television; 34 (3): 357-368
Publisher:
Taylor & Francis
Journal:
Historical Journal of Film, Radio and Television
Issue Date:
11-Sep-2014
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/583067
DOI:
10.1080/01439685.2014.937181
Additional Links:
http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/01439685.2014.937181
Abstract:
This article examines how the material design of the television studio influenced the resulting fictional mise en scene of different narrative formats broadcast on UK television. Through this spatial analysis the article considers how a bias was formed within the industry between high end single plays and popular series. Using archival production documents that detail the design and resourcing of studio space, it explores the different working studio practices that existed for the single play and series from 1955-63. Drawing on studio floor-plans, internal memos and institutional records of policy discussions that detail the creation, modification and resourcing of studio production facilities, including production control rooms, lighting systems, and camerawork, this article compares the different production practices for the popular BBC police series, Dixon of Dock Green (BBC 1955- 1976) and the anthology series of single plays Armchair Theatre (ABC 1956-74). Although each text was produced for the rival channels of BBC1 and ITV, my intention is not to provide a direct institutional comparison of the production practices of the BBC and ABC but rather to demonstrate how the design and technological resources of a studio can impact upon the aesthetics of different televisual narrative formats. Hence my primary aim is to examine the relationship between the physical attributes of studios and resultant styles of the cheaper, popular series and the more prestigious single play, offering an original approach to considering television space.
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Keywords:
British television drama; British television studio; BBC; ABC; Armchair Theatre; Dixon of Dock Green
ISSN:
0143-9685; 1465-3451
Rights:
Author can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing) subject to 18 month embargo. For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo [Accessed 01/12/2015]

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorLamb, Benen
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-01T16:23:58Zen
dc.date.available2015-12-01T16:23:58Zen
dc.date.issued2014-09-11en
dc.identifier.citationHistorical Journal of Film, Radio and Television; 34 (3): 357-368en
dc.identifier.issn0143-9685en
dc.identifier.issn1465-3451en
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/01439685.2014.937181en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10149/583067en
dc.description.abstractThis article examines how the material design of the television studio influenced the resulting fictional mise en scene of different narrative formats broadcast on UK television. Through this spatial analysis the article considers how a bias was formed within the industry between high end single plays and popular series. Using archival production documents that detail the design and resourcing of studio space, it explores the different working studio practices that existed for the single play and series from 1955-63. Drawing on studio floor-plans, internal memos and institutional records of policy discussions that detail the creation, modification and resourcing of studio production facilities, including production control rooms, lighting systems, and camerawork, this article compares the different production practices for the popular BBC police series, Dixon of Dock Green (BBC 1955- 1976) and the anthology series of single plays Armchair Theatre (ABC 1956-74). Although each text was produced for the rival channels of BBC1 and ITV, my intention is not to provide a direct institutional comparison of the production practices of the BBC and ABC but rather to demonstrate how the design and technological resources of a studio can impact upon the aesthetics of different televisual narrative formats. Hence my primary aim is to examine the relationship between the physical attributes of studios and resultant styles of the cheaper, popular series and the more prestigious single play, offering an original approach to considering television space.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherTaylor & Francisen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/01439685.2014.937181en
dc.rightsAuthor can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing) subject to 18 month embargo. For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo [Accessed 01/12/2015]en
dc.subjectBritish television dramaen
dc.subjectBritish television studioen
dc.subjectBBCen
dc.subjectABCen
dc.subjectArmchair Theatreen
dc.subjectDixon of Dock Greenen
dc.titleNarrative Form and the British Television Studio 1955–1963en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentTeesside University. Institute of Design Culture and the Artsen
dc.identifier.journalHistorical Journal of Film, Radio and Televisionen
or.citation.harvardLamb, Ben 'Narrative Form and the British Television Studio 1955–1963' Historical Journal of Film, Radio and Television; 34 (3): 357-368en
dc.eprint.versionAuthor accepted manuscripten
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