Rapid discharge from hospital in the last days of life: An evaluation of the key issues and the contribution of an end of life discharge sister role

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/583212
Title:
Rapid discharge from hospital in the last days of life: An evaluation of the key issues and the contribution of an end of life discharge sister role
Authors:
Jones, S. E. (Susan); Hamilton, S. (Sharon); Nicholson, A. (Alex)
Affiliation:
Teesside University. Health and Social Care Institute
Citation:
Jones, S., Hamilton, S., Nicholson, A. 'Rapid discharge from hospital in the last days of life: An evaluation of the key issues and the contribution of an end of life discharge sister role' International Journal of Palliative Nursing; 21 (12): 588-595
Publisher:
Mark Allen Healthcare
Journal:
International Journal of Palliative Nursing
Issue Date:
26-Dec-2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/583212
DOI:
10.12968/ijpn.2015.21.12.588
Additional Links:
http://www.magonlinelibrary.com/doi/abs/10.12968/ijpn.2015.21.12.588?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori%3Arid%3Acrossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub%3Dpubmed&
Abstract:
Background When the time comes, most people wish to die at home. Nevertheless, many deaths occur in hospital, often because of delays in the discharge process. This study explored the issues surrounding rapid discharge from hospital in the final days of life, and evaluated the contribution of a discharge sister role. Methods A qualitative design was used, incorporating focus groups and interviews with key stakeholders. Results A total of 75 staff and 7 carers participated. Participants highlighted the small window of opportunity available to facilitate a rapid but safe discharge from hospital. Early recognition of the last days of life was vital as was the availability of a skilled healthcare professional, such as the discharge sister, to co-ordinate the patient’s journey from hospital to preferred place of death. Conclusions Rapid discharge is challenging and requires high levels of skill. The discharge sister navigated complex organisational systems to facilitate rapid discharge for those who might otherwise have died in hospital.
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Keywords:
Rapid discharge; discharge planning; preferred place of death
ISSN:
1357-6321
Rights:
Author can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing). For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo [Accessed: 04/12/2015]

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorJones, S. E. (Susan)en
dc.contributor.authorHamilton, S. (Sharon)en
dc.contributor.authorNicholson, A. (Alex)en
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-04T12:16:46Zen
dc.date.available2015-12-04T12:16:46Zen
dc.date.issued2015-12-26en
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal of Palliative Nursing; 21 (12): 588-595en
dc.identifier.issn1357-6321en
dc.identifier.doi10.12968/ijpn.2015.21.12.588en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10149/583212en
dc.description.abstractBackground When the time comes, most people wish to die at home. Nevertheless, many deaths occur in hospital, often because of delays in the discharge process. This study explored the issues surrounding rapid discharge from hospital in the final days of life, and evaluated the contribution of a discharge sister role. Methods A qualitative design was used, incorporating focus groups and interviews with key stakeholders. Results A total of 75 staff and 7 carers participated. Participants highlighted the small window of opportunity available to facilitate a rapid but safe discharge from hospital. Early recognition of the last days of life was vital as was the availability of a skilled healthcare professional, such as the discharge sister, to co-ordinate the patient’s journey from hospital to preferred place of death. Conclusions Rapid discharge is challenging and requires high levels of skill. The discharge sister navigated complex organisational systems to facilitate rapid discharge for those who might otherwise have died in hospital.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherMark Allen Healthcareen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.magonlinelibrary.com/doi/abs/10.12968/ijpn.2015.21.12.588?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori%3Arid%3Acrossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub%3Dpubmed&en
dc.rightsAuthor can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing). For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo [Accessed: 04/12/2015]en
dc.subjectRapid dischargeen
dc.subjectdischarge planningen
dc.subjectpreferred place of deathen
dc.titleRapid discharge from hospital in the last days of life: An evaluation of the key issues and the contribution of an end of life discharge sister roleen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentTeesside University. Health and Social Care Instituteen
dc.identifier.journalInternational Journal of Palliative Nursingen
or.citation.harvardJones, S., Hamilton, S., Nicholson, A. 'Rapid discharge from hospital in the last days of life: An evaluation of the key issues and the contribution of an end of life discharge sister role' International Journal of Palliative Nursing; 21 (12): 588-595en
dc.eprint.versionAuthor accepted manuscripten
dc.date.accepted2015-12-03en
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