Class, industrialization and the Church of England: the case of the Durham diocese in the nineteenth century

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/58492
Title:
Class, industrialization and the Church of England: the case of the Durham diocese in the nineteenth century
Authors:
Lee, R. (Robert)
Affiliation:
University of Teesside
Citation:
Lee, R. (2006) 'Class, industrialization and the Church of England: the case of the Durham diocese in the nineteenth century', Past & Present, 191 pp.165-188.
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Journal:
Past & Present
Issue Date:
May-2006
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/58492
DOI:
10.1093/pastj/gtj008
Abstract:
By the early twentieth century, the diocese of Durham was beginning to open its doors to a very different class of clerical recruit. An institution that had once jealously guarded the education, provenance and pedigree of its clerical intake was now casting its net much wider, and this article tries to explain why. The article describes how the Durham diocese embarked upon an ‘internal mission’ into the working-class hearts of dark- ness that its coalfield communities were becoming. At the centre of this strategy lay the University of Durham, founded in the 1830s to train a new generation of clergymen. It is argued here that the University was dovetailed into a programme of diocesan reform, intended to invigorate a new, tight-knit sense of local identity which brought to an end a series of Barchester-like ecclesiastical traditions. Much of the discussion is based upon the study of the diocesan clergy’s social backgrounds.
Type:
Article
Keywords:
Church of England; Durham; class; nineteenth century; diocesan reform; clergy
ISSN:
1477-464X
Rights:
Subject to restrictions, author can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing). For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ [Accessed 23/11/09]
Citation Count:
0 [Web of Science, 23/11/2009]

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorLee, R. (Robert)-
dc.date.accessioned2009-04-01T10:53:26Z-
dc.date.available2009-04-01T10:53:26Z-
dc.date.issued2006-05-
dc.identifier.citationPast & Present; 191: 165-188-
dc.identifier.issn1477-464X-
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/pastj/gtj008-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10149/58492-
dc.description.abstractBy the early twentieth century, the diocese of Durham was beginning to open its doors to a very different class of clerical recruit. An institution that had once jealously guarded the education, provenance and pedigree of its clerical intake was now casting its net much wider, and this article tries to explain why. The article describes how the Durham diocese embarked upon an ‘internal mission’ into the working-class hearts of dark- ness that its coalfield communities were becoming. At the centre of this strategy lay the University of Durham, founded in the 1830s to train a new generation of clergymen. It is argued here that the University was dovetailed into a programme of diocesan reform, intended to invigorate a new, tight-knit sense of local identity which brought to an end a series of Barchester-like ecclesiastical traditions. Much of the discussion is based upon the study of the diocesan clergy’s social backgrounds.-
dc.publisherOxford University Press-
dc.rightsSubject to restrictions, author can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing). For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ [Accessed 23/11/09]-
dc.subjectChurch of England-
dc.subjectDurham-
dc.subjectclass-
dc.subjectnineteenth century-
dc.subjectdiocesan reform-
dc.subjectclergy-
dc.titleClass, industrialization and the Church of England: the case of the Durham diocese in the nineteenth century-
dc.typeArticle-
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Teesside-
dc.identifier.journalPast & Present-
ref.assessmentRAE 2008-
ref.citationcount0 [Web of Science, 23/11/2009]-
or.citation.harvardLee, R. (2006) 'Class, industrialization and the Church of England: the case of the Durham diocese in the nineteenth century', Past & Present, 191 pp.165-188.-
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