Twelve experiments in restorative justice: the Jerry Lee program of randomized trials of restorative justice conferences

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/592757
Title:
Twelve experiments in restorative justice: the Jerry Lee program of randomized trials of restorative justice conferences
Authors:
Sherman, L. W. (Lawrence); Strang, H. (Heather); Barnes, G. (Geoffrey); Woods, D. J. (Daniel); Bennett, S. (Sarah); Inkpen, N. (Nova); Newbury-Birch, D. (Dorothy); Rossner, M. (Meredith); Angel, C. (Caroline); Mearns, M. (Malcolm); Slothower, M. (Molly)
Affiliation:
Teesside University. Health and Social Care Institute.
Citation:
Sherman, L. W., Strang, H., Barnes, G., Woods, D. J., Bennett, S., Inkpen, N., Newbury-Birch, D., Rossner, M., Angel, C., Mearns, M., Slothower, M. (2015) 'Twelve experiments in restorative justice: the Jerry Lee program of randomized trials of restorative justice conferences' Journal of Experimental Criminology; First online: 23 December 2015
Publisher:
Springer
Journal:
Journal of Experimental Criminology
Issue Date:
23-Dec-2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/592757
DOI:
10.1007/s11292-015-9247-6
Additional Links:
http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s11292-015-9247-6
Abstract:
Objectives We conducted and measured outcomes from the Jerry Lee Program of 12 randomized trials over two decades in Australia and the United Kingdom (UK), testing an identical method of restorative justice taught by the same trainers to hundreds of police officers and others who delivered it to 2231 offenders and 1179 victims in 1995–2004. The article provides a review of the scientific progress and policy effects of the program, as described in 75 publications and papers arising from it, including previously unpublished results of our ongoing analyses. Methods After random assignment in four Australian tests diverting criminal or juvenile cases from prosecution to restorative justice conferences (RJCs), and eight UK tests of supplementing criminal or juvenile proceedings with RJCs, we followed intention-to-treat group differences between offenders for up to 18 years, and for victims up to 10 years. Results We distil and modify prior research reports into 18 updated evidence-based conclusions about the effects of RJCs on both victims and offenders. Initial reductions in repeat offending among offenders assigned to RJCs (compared to controls) were found in 10 of our 12 tests. Nine of the ten successes were for crimes with personal victims who participated in the RJCs, with clear benefits in both short- and long-term measures, including less prevalence of post-traumatic stress symptoms. Moderator effects across and within experiments showed that RJCs work best for the most frequent and serious offenders for repeat offending outcomes, with other clear moderator effects for poly-drug use and offense seriousness. Conclusions RJ conferences organized and led (most often) by specially-trained police produced substantial short-term, and some long-term, benefits for both crime victims and their offenders, across a range of offense types and stages of the criminal justice processes on two continents, but with important moderator effects. These conclusions are made possible by testing a new kind of justice on a programmatic basis that would allow prospective meta-analysis, rather than doing one experiment at a time. This finding provides evidence that funding agencies could get far more evidence for the same cost from programs of identical, but multiple, RCTs of the identical innovative methods, rather than funding one RCT at a time.
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Keywords:
Randomized controlled trials; Policing; Prospective meta-analysis; Restorative justice; Aboriginal Australians; Recidivism
ISSN:
1573-3750; 1572-8315
Rights:
This is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. For full details see http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11292-015-9247-6?wt_mc=internal.event.1.SEM.ArticleAuthorOnlineFirst [Accessed: 04/01/2015]

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorSherman, L. W. (Lawrence)en
dc.contributor.authorStrang, H. (Heather)en
dc.contributor.authorBarnes, G. (Geoffrey)en
dc.contributor.authorWoods, D. J. (Daniel)en
dc.contributor.authorBennett, S. (Sarah)en
dc.contributor.authorInkpen, N. (Nova)en
dc.contributor.authorNewbury-Birch, D. (Dorothy)en
dc.contributor.authorRossner, M. (Meredith)en
dc.contributor.authorAngel, C. (Caroline)en
dc.contributor.authorMearns, M. (Malcolm)en
dc.contributor.authorSlothower, M. (Molly)en
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-04T09:52:18Zen
dc.date.available2016-01-04T09:52:18Zen
dc.date.issued2015-12-23en
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Experimental Criminology; First online: 23 December 2015en
dc.identifier.issn1573-3750en
dc.identifier.issn1572-8315en
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s11292-015-9247-6en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10149/592757en
dc.description.abstractObjectives We conducted and measured outcomes from the Jerry Lee Program of 12 randomized trials over two decades in Australia and the United Kingdom (UK), testing an identical method of restorative justice taught by the same trainers to hundreds of police officers and others who delivered it to 2231 offenders and 1179 victims in 1995–2004. The article provides a review of the scientific progress and policy effects of the program, as described in 75 publications and papers arising from it, including previously unpublished results of our ongoing analyses. Methods After random assignment in four Australian tests diverting criminal or juvenile cases from prosecution to restorative justice conferences (RJCs), and eight UK tests of supplementing criminal or juvenile proceedings with RJCs, we followed intention-to-treat group differences between offenders for up to 18 years, and for victims up to 10 years. Results We distil and modify prior research reports into 18 updated evidence-based conclusions about the effects of RJCs on both victims and offenders. Initial reductions in repeat offending among offenders assigned to RJCs (compared to controls) were found in 10 of our 12 tests. Nine of the ten successes were for crimes with personal victims who participated in the RJCs, with clear benefits in both short- and long-term measures, including less prevalence of post-traumatic stress symptoms. Moderator effects across and within experiments showed that RJCs work best for the most frequent and serious offenders for repeat offending outcomes, with other clear moderator effects for poly-drug use and offense seriousness. Conclusions RJ conferences organized and led (most often) by specially-trained police produced substantial short-term, and some long-term, benefits for both crime victims and their offenders, across a range of offense types and stages of the criminal justice processes on two continents, but with important moderator effects. These conclusions are made possible by testing a new kind of justice on a programmatic basis that would allow prospective meta-analysis, rather than doing one experiment at a time. This finding provides evidence that funding agencies could get far more evidence for the same cost from programs of identical, but multiple, RCTs of the identical innovative methods, rather than funding one RCT at a time.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSpringeren
dc.relation.urlhttp://link.springer.com/10.1007/s11292-015-9247-6en
dc.rightsThis is an open access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. For full details see http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s11292-015-9247-6?wt_mc=internal.event.1.SEM.ArticleAuthorOnlineFirst [Accessed: 04/01/2015]en
dc.subjectRandomized controlled trialsen
dc.subjectPolicingen
dc.subjectProspective meta-analysisen
dc.subjectRestorative justiceen
dc.subjectAboriginal Australiansen
dc.subjectRecidivismen
dc.titleTwelve experiments in restorative justice: the Jerry Lee program of randomized trials of restorative justice conferencesen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentTeesside University. Health and Social Care Institute.en
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Experimental Criminologyen
or.citation.harvardSherman, L. W., Strang, H., Barnes, G., Woods, D. J., Bennett, S., Inkpen, N., Newbury-Birch, D., Rossner, M., Angel, C., Mearns, M., Slothower, M. (2015) 'Twelve experiments in restorative justice: the Jerry Lee program of randomized trials of restorative justice conferences' Journal of Experimental Criminology; First online: 23 December 2015en
dc.date.accepted2015-11-03en
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