Access to entrepreneurial finance by women and poverty reduction in Pakistan

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/594895
Title:
Access to entrepreneurial finance by women and poverty reduction in Pakistan
Book Title:
Research handbook on entrepreneurial finance
Authors:
Hussain, J. G. (Javed); Mahmood, S. (Samia); Scott, J. M. (Jonathan)
Editors:
Hussain, J.G. (Javed); Scott, J.M. (Jonathan)
Affiliation:
Teesside University. Technology Futures Institute
Citation:
Hussain, J. G. (Javed); Mahmood, S. (Samia); Scott, J. M. (Jonathan) 'Access to entrepreneurial finance by women and poverty reduction in Pakistan' Hussain, J. G. (Javed); Scott, J. M. (Jonathan) eds, (2015) Research Handbook on Entrepreneurial Finance, Edward Elgar Publishing.
Publisher:
Edward Elgar
Issue Date:
1-Dec-2015
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/594895
Additional Links:
http://www.e-elgar.com/shop/research-handbook-on-entrepreneurial-finance
Abstract:
Access to credit for entrepreneurial women is of interest to governments, academics and policymakers worldwide due to its significant socio-economic and poverty-reducing implications. In the context of Pakistan, financial institutions tend to cater for the upper- and middle-classes to the exclusion of the poor in general and low-income women in particular. Whilst poverty is a multifaceted term categorized as financial (income) poverty and human poverty, financial poverty specifically serves as a barrier to the growth of women-owned enterprises which, in turn, gives rise to their exclusion from labour markets and social, educational and health services. Financial exclusion directly correlates with lower levels of empowerment or independence within the household due to a lack of access to health services and basic education. Such inequalities in access to entrepreneurial finance impact upon women disproportionally, as the proposed interventions tend to be through microcredit programmes targeted at low-income women. In this chapter we assess the relationship between microfinance and poverty reduction using a binary logistic model. The findings indicate that microfinance positively reduces financial poverty; however, it contributes much less to human poverty reduction. The chapter concludes with some observations on the experiences of women in accessing finance and on the role and effectiveness of microfinance to aid Pakistani women’s access to finance.
Type:
Book Chapter
Language:
en
Keywords:
entrepreneurship; finance; microfinance; Pakistan; women; poverty
ISBN:
9781783478781
Rights:
Author can archive post print

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHussain, J. G. (Javed)en
dc.contributor.authorMahmood, S. (Samia)en
dc.contributor.authorScott, J. M. (Jonathan)en
dc.contributor.editorHussain, J.G. (Javed)en
dc.contributor.editorScott, J.M. (Jonathan)en
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-26T14:22:27Zen
dc.date.available2016-01-26T14:22:27Zen
dc.date.issued2015-12-01en
dc.identifier.isbn9781783478781en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10149/594895en
dc.description.abstractAccess to credit for entrepreneurial women is of interest to governments, academics and policymakers worldwide due to its significant socio-economic and poverty-reducing implications. In the context of Pakistan, financial institutions tend to cater for the upper- and middle-classes to the exclusion of the poor in general and low-income women in particular. Whilst poverty is a multifaceted term categorized as financial (income) poverty and human poverty, financial poverty specifically serves as a barrier to the growth of women-owned enterprises which, in turn, gives rise to their exclusion from labour markets and social, educational and health services. Financial exclusion directly correlates with lower levels of empowerment or independence within the household due to a lack of access to health services and basic education. Such inequalities in access to entrepreneurial finance impact upon women disproportionally, as the proposed interventions tend to be through microcredit programmes targeted at low-income women. In this chapter we assess the relationship between microfinance and poverty reduction using a binary logistic model. The findings indicate that microfinance positively reduces financial poverty; however, it contributes much less to human poverty reduction. The chapter concludes with some observations on the experiences of women in accessing finance and on the role and effectiveness of microfinance to aid Pakistani women’s access to finance.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherEdward Elgaren
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.e-elgar.com/shop/research-handbook-on-entrepreneurial-financeen
dc.rightsAuthor can archive post printen
dc.subjectentrepreneurshipen
dc.subjectfinanceen
dc.subjectmicrofinanceen
dc.subjectPakistanen
dc.subjectwomenen
dc.subjectpovertyen
dc.titleAccess to entrepreneurial finance by women and poverty reduction in Pakistanen
dc.typeBook Chapteren
dc.contributor.departmentTeesside University. Technology Futures Instituteen
dc.title.bookResearch handbook on entrepreneurial financeen
or.citation.harvardHussain, J. G. (Javed); Mahmood, S. (Samia); Scott, J. M. (Jonathan) 'Access to entrepreneurial finance by women and poverty reduction in Pakistan' Hussain, J. G. (Javed); Scott, J. M. (Jonathan) eds, (2015) Research Handbook on Entrepreneurial Finance, Edward Elgar Publishing.en
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