The non-contact detection and identification of blood stained fingerprints using visible wavelength hyperspectral imaging: Part II effectiveness on a range of substrates

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/600526
Title:
The non-contact detection and identification of blood stained fingerprints using visible wavelength hyperspectral imaging: Part II effectiveness on a range of substrates
Authors:
Cadd, S. (Samuel); Li, B. (Bo); Beveridge, P. (Peter); O’Hare, W. T. (William); Campbell, A. (Andrew); Islam, M. (Meezanul)
Affiliation:
Teesside University. Technology Futures Institute
Citation:
Cadd, S., Li, B., Beveridge, P., O’Hare, W. T., Campbell, A., Islam, M. (2016) 'The non-contact detection and identification of blood stained fingerprints using visible wavelength hyperspectral imaging: Part II effectiveness on a range of substrates' Science & Justice; Available online 15 February 2016
Publisher:
Elsevier
Journal:
Science & Justice
Issue Date:
15-Feb-2016
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/600526
DOI:
10.1016/j.scijus.2016.01.005
Additional Links:
http://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1355030616000083
Abstract:
Biological samples, such as blood, are regularly encountered at violent crime scenes and successful identification is critical for criminal investigations. Blood is one of the most commonly encountered fingerprint contaminants and current identification methods involve presumptive tests or wet chemical enhancement. These are destructive however; can affect subsequent DNA sampling; and do not confirm the presence of blood, meaning they are susceptible to false positives. A novel application of visible wavelength reflectance hyperspectral imaging (HSI) has been used for the non-contact, non-destructive detection and identification of blood stained fingerprints across a range of coloured substrates of varying porosities. The identification of blood was based on the Soret γ band absorption of haemoglobin between 400 nm and 500 nm. Ridge detail was successfully visualised to the third depletion across light coloured substrates and the stain detected to the tenth depletion on both porous and non-porous substrates. A higher resolution setup for blood stained fingerprints on black tiles, detected ridge detail to the third depletion and the stain to the tenth depletion, demonstrating considerable advancements from previous work. Diluted blood stains at 1500 and 1000 fold dilutions for wet and dry stains respectively were also detected on pig skin as a replica for human skin.
Type:
Article
Language:
en
ISSN:
13550306
Rights:
Following 12 month embargo author can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing). For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo [Accessed: 03/03/2016]

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorCadd, S. (Samuel)en
dc.contributor.authorLi, B. (Bo)en
dc.contributor.authorBeveridge, P. (Peter)en
dc.contributor.authorO’Hare, W. T. (William)en
dc.contributor.authorCampbell, A. (Andrew)en
dc.contributor.authorIslam, M. (Meezanul)en
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-03T12:34:51Zen
dc.date.available2016-03-03T12:34:51Zen
dc.date.issued2016-02-15en
dc.identifier.citationScience & Justice; Available online 15 February 2016en
dc.identifier.issn13550306en
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.scijus.2016.01.005en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10149/600526en
dc.description.abstractBiological samples, such as blood, are regularly encountered at violent crime scenes and successful identification is critical for criminal investigations. Blood is one of the most commonly encountered fingerprint contaminants and current identification methods involve presumptive tests or wet chemical enhancement. These are destructive however; can affect subsequent DNA sampling; and do not confirm the presence of blood, meaning they are susceptible to false positives. A novel application of visible wavelength reflectance hyperspectral imaging (HSI) has been used for the non-contact, non-destructive detection and identification of blood stained fingerprints across a range of coloured substrates of varying porosities. The identification of blood was based on the Soret γ band absorption of haemoglobin between 400 nm and 500 nm. Ridge detail was successfully visualised to the third depletion across light coloured substrates and the stain detected to the tenth depletion on both porous and non-porous substrates. A higher resolution setup for blood stained fingerprints on black tiles, detected ridge detail to the third depletion and the stain to the tenth depletion, demonstrating considerable advancements from previous work. Diluted blood stains at 1500 and 1000 fold dilutions for wet and dry stains respectively were also detected on pig skin as a replica for human skin.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherElsevieren
dc.relation.urlhttp://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1355030616000083en
dc.rightsFollowing 12 month embargo author can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing). For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo [Accessed: 03/03/2016]en
dc.titleThe non-contact detection and identification of blood stained fingerprints using visible wavelength hyperspectral imaging: Part II effectiveness on a range of substratesen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentTeesside University. Technology Futures Instituteen
dc.identifier.journalScience & Justiceen
or.citation.harvardCadd, S., Li, B., Beveridge, P., O’Hare, W. T., Campbell, A., Islam, M. (2016) 'The non-contact detection and identification of blood stained fingerprints using visible wavelength hyperspectral imaging: Part II effectiveness on a range of substrates' Science & Justice; Available online 15 February 2016en
dc.eprint.versionPost-printen
dc.embargo12 monthsen
dc.date.accepted2016-01-29en
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