What do we need to do to sustain compassionate medical care?

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/617608
Title:
What do we need to do to sustain compassionate medical care?
Authors:
Chadwick, R. (Raymond); Lown, B. A. (Beth)
Affiliation:
Teesside University. Health and Social Care Institute
Citation:
Chadwick, R. and Lown, B. A. (2016) 'What do we need to sustain compassionate medical care?' Medicine; Accepted for publication: Jul 25 2016
Publisher:
Elsevier
Journal:
Medicine
Issue Date:
2016
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/617608
Additional Links:
https://www.elsevier.com/journals/medicine/1357-3039
Abstract:
The term ‘compassion’ is widely used, but what it requires is rarely analysed. It has been defined as understanding another’s suffering, combined with commitment to doing something to relieve this. It involves an emotional component – a personal reaction to the plight of another – and sensitivity to the personal meaning a condition may hold for the individual. An emotional response to tragic circumstance is by nature spontaneous. But compassion also requires deliberate responses – respect, courtesy and attentive listening. The human brain is hard-wired with the capacity to share the experience of others, including their emotions. So the potential for empathy and compassion is innate. However, this can be limited by repeated exposure to suffering, when the neural networks involved become down-regulated. In addition, an organisational culture geared to performance targets with diminishing resources can lead to exhaustion and burnout. This results in reduced capacity to attend to the needs of patients. The traditional solutions of education and further research may not be sufficient. A framework is proposed for doctors to contribute to compassionate medical care, taking account of organisational factors. The key elements are: awareness; self-care; attentive listening to patients; collaboration; and support for colleagues.
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Keywords:
compassion; empathy
ISSN:
1357-3039
Rights:
Following 12 month embargo author can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing). CC-BY-NC-ND license. For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/issn/1357-3039/ [Accessed: 27/07/2016]

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorChadwick, R. (Raymond)en
dc.contributor.authorLown, B. A. (Beth)en
dc.date.accessioned2016-07-27T09:43:58Z-
dc.date.available2016-07-27T09:43:58Z-
dc.date.issued2016-
dc.identifier.citationMedicine; Accepted for publication: Jul 25 2016en
dc.identifier.issn1357-3039-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10149/617608-
dc.description.abstractThe term ‘compassion’ is widely used, but what it requires is rarely analysed. It has been defined as understanding another’s suffering, combined with commitment to doing something to relieve this. It involves an emotional component – a personal reaction to the plight of another – and sensitivity to the personal meaning a condition may hold for the individual. An emotional response to tragic circumstance is by nature spontaneous. But compassion also requires deliberate responses – respect, courtesy and attentive listening. The human brain is hard-wired with the capacity to share the experience of others, including their emotions. So the potential for empathy and compassion is innate. However, this can be limited by repeated exposure to suffering, when the neural networks involved become down-regulated. In addition, an organisational culture geared to performance targets with diminishing resources can lead to exhaustion and burnout. This results in reduced capacity to attend to the needs of patients. The traditional solutions of education and further research may not be sufficient. A framework is proposed for doctors to contribute to compassionate medical care, taking account of organisational factors. The key elements are: awareness; self-care; attentive listening to patients; collaboration; and support for colleagues.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherElsevieren
dc.relation.urlhttps://www.elsevier.com/journals/medicine/1357-3039en
dc.rightsFollowing 12 month embargo author can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing). CC-BY-NC-ND license. For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/issn/1357-3039/ [Accessed: 27/07/2016]en
dc.subjectcompassionen
dc.subjectempathyen
dc.titleWhat do we need to do to sustain compassionate medical care?en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentTeesside University. Health and Social Care Instituteen
dc.identifier.journalMedicineen
or.citation.harvardChadwick, R. and Lown, B. A. (2016) 'What do we need to sustain compassionate medical care?' Medicine; Accepted for publication: Jul 25 2016en
dc.eprint.versionPost-printen
dc.embargo12 monthsen
dc.date.accepted2016-07-25-
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