Effects of Spinal Mobilisations on Lumbar and Hamstring ROM and sEMG: A Randomised Control Trial

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/620647
Title:
Effects of Spinal Mobilisations on Lumbar and Hamstring ROM and sEMG: A Randomised Control Trial
Authors:
Chesterton, P. (Paul) ( 0000-0002-9432-0675 ) ; Payton, S. J. (Stephen)
Affiliation:
Teesside University. School of Social Sciences Business and Law
Citation:
Chesterton, P., Payton, S. (2016) 'Effects of Spinal Mobilisations on Lumbar and Hamstring ROM and sEMG: A Randomised Control Trial' Physiotherapy Practice and Research; 38 ( 1 ) pp. 17 - 25 .
Publisher:
IOS Press
Journal:
Physiotherapy Practice and Research
Issue Date:
30-Dec-2016
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/620647
DOI:
10.3233/PPR-160081
Abstract:
Introduction: This study aimed to compare the immediate effects of Posterior Anterior (PA) L4 and L5 mobilisations on range of motion and muscle activity measures in the lumbar and hamstring regions of asymptomatic individuals. Methods: Thirty-eight participants were randomly allocated to a mobilisation (n=20) or control (n=18) group. The mobilisation group received central PA mobilisations to the L4 and L5 vertebrae, three times for two minutes. The control group received no mobilisation. Pre- and post-test measures included lumbar range of motion, measured by the modified Schober test and hamstring extensibility by the active knee extension test. Local Erector Spinae and Biceps Femoris muscle activation were also measured by surface Electromyography. Data were analysed using magnitude-based inferences. Results: Lumbar mobilisations had a most likely beneficial effect on active lumbar flexion 18.6% (90% CL 11.8% ± 25.8%) and active knee extension range 22.8% (-29.6% ± 15.2%). Mobilisations had a possible beneficial effect in sEMG activation reduction of the Erector Spinae -4.7% (-10.5% ± 1.4%) and Bicep Femoris -6.1% (-13.1% ± 1.6%) during lumbar flexion. Likely beneficial effects of reduced sEMG were found following mobilisations during the active knee extension test for the Erector Spinae -18.3% (-27.7% – 7.6%) and Biceps Femoris muscle activity -20.8% (-30.9% ± 9.2%). Discussion: L4 and L5 mobilisations increase lumbar and hamstring range of motion in the immediate term. Our unique finding was that, in this sample population, muscle activity in both local Erector Spinae and Biceps Femoris reduced, most likely due to the mobilisations applied.
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Rights:
Author can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing) without embargo. For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/issn/2213-0683/ [Accessed: 05/12/2016]

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorChesterton, P. (Paul)en
dc.contributor.authorPayton, S. J. (Stephen)en
dc.date.accessioned2016-12-05T16:06:46Z-
dc.date.available2016-12-05T16:06:46Z-
dc.date.issued2016-12-30-
dc.identifier.citationPhysiotherapy Practice and Research; 38 ( 1 ): pp. 17 - 25 .en
dc.identifier.doi10.3233/PPR-160081-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10149/620647-
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: This study aimed to compare the immediate effects of Posterior Anterior (PA) L4 and L5 mobilisations on range of motion and muscle activity measures in the lumbar and hamstring regions of asymptomatic individuals. Methods: Thirty-eight participants were randomly allocated to a mobilisation (n=20) or control (n=18) group. The mobilisation group received central PA mobilisations to the L4 and L5 vertebrae, three times for two minutes. The control group received no mobilisation. Pre- and post-test measures included lumbar range of motion, measured by the modified Schober test and hamstring extensibility by the active knee extension test. Local Erector Spinae and Biceps Femoris muscle activation were also measured by surface Electromyography. Data were analysed using magnitude-based inferences. Results: Lumbar mobilisations had a most likely beneficial effect on active lumbar flexion 18.6% (90% CL 11.8% ± 25.8%) and active knee extension range 22.8% (-29.6% ± 15.2%). Mobilisations had a possible beneficial effect in sEMG activation reduction of the Erector Spinae -4.7% (-10.5% ± 1.4%) and Bicep Femoris -6.1% (-13.1% ± 1.6%) during lumbar flexion. Likely beneficial effects of reduced sEMG were found following mobilisations during the active knee extension test for the Erector Spinae -18.3% (-27.7% – 7.6%) and Biceps Femoris muscle activity -20.8% (-30.9% ± 9.2%). Discussion: L4 and L5 mobilisations increase lumbar and hamstring range of motion in the immediate term. Our unique finding was that, in this sample population, muscle activity in both local Erector Spinae and Biceps Femoris reduced, most likely due to the mobilisations applied.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherIOS Pressen
dc.rightsAuthor can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing) without embargo. For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/issn/2213-0683/ [Accessed: 05/12/2016]en
dc.titleEffects of Spinal Mobilisations on Lumbar and Hamstring ROM and sEMG: A Randomised Control Trialen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentTeesside University. School of Social Sciences Business and Lawen
dc.identifier.journalPhysiotherapy Practice and Researchen
or.citation.harvardChesterton, P., Payton, S. (2016) 'Effects of Spinal Mobilisations on Lumbar and Hamstring ROM and sEMG: A Randomised Control Trial' Physiotherapy Practice and Research; 38 ( 1 ) pp. 17 - 25 .en
dc.eprint.versionPost-printen
dc.embargoNoneen
dc.date.accepted2016-11-15-
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