The effect of manual acupuncture and electroacupuncture on lower limb muscle strength

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/620810
Title:
The effect of manual acupuncture and electroacupuncture on lower limb muscle strength
Other Titles:
手捻针和电针对下肢肌力的影响
Authors:
Payton, S. (Stephen); Bailey, S. D. (Steven)
Affiliation:
Teesside University, School of Social Science Business and Law
Citation:
Payton, S., Bailey, S. D. (2017) 'The effect of manual acupuncture and electroacupuncture on lower limb muscle strength' Journal of Acupuncture and Tuina Science; 15 (1):47
Publisher:
Springer
Journal:
Journal of Acupuncture and Tuina Science
Issue Date:
24-Feb-2017
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/620810
DOI:
10.1007/s11726-017-0974-2
Additional Links:
http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s11726-017-0974-2
Abstract:
Objective To determine whether six weeks' of acupuncture has a positive effect on plantar flexion muscle strength and whether electroacupuncture (EA) has a greater effect than manual acupuncture (MA) on plantar flexion, so that the most beneficial method of acupuncture can be established for strengthening muscles. Methods A randomized controlled trial with parallel groups. A total of 20 participants were randomly assigned to three groups: a control/non-acupuncture group (n=6), a manual acupuncture group (MAG) (n=8) and an electroacupuncture group (EAG) (n=6). MAG and EAG received three 25-minute treatments per week for 6 weeks. The control group continued with their normal training activity and received no treatment. The maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) of the ankle plantar-flexors at 30° per second was measured using Biodex system 3. Results Both MA and EA had a positive effect in increasing plantar flexion strength. The likelihood for this happening was high; 69% for MA and 92% for EA when compared with the control group. However the effect size was small for both groups. There was only a trivial difference in the effect size between the EAG and the MAG in regards to average plantar flexion torque. Conclusion EA and MA have a beneficial effect on plantar flexion muscle strength compared with the control group in healthy population.
Type:
Article
ISSN:
1672-3597; 1993-0399
Rights:
Subject to 12 month embargo author can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing). For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/issn/1672-3597/ [Accessed: 09/03/2017]

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorPayton, S. (Stephen)en
dc.contributor.authorBailey, S. D. (Steven)en
dc.date.accessioned2017-03-09T10:04:15Z-
dc.date.available2017-03-09T10:04:15Z-
dc.date.issued2017-02-24-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Acupuncture and Tuina Science; 15 (1):47en
dc.identifier.issn1672-3597-
dc.identifier.issn1993-0399-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s11726-017-0974-2-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10149/620810-
dc.description.abstractObjective To determine whether six weeks' of acupuncture has a positive effect on plantar flexion muscle strength and whether electroacupuncture (EA) has a greater effect than manual acupuncture (MA) on plantar flexion, so that the most beneficial method of acupuncture can be established for strengthening muscles. Methods A randomized controlled trial with parallel groups. A total of 20 participants were randomly assigned to three groups: a control/non-acupuncture group (n=6), a manual acupuncture group (MAG) (n=8) and an electroacupuncture group (EAG) (n=6). MAG and EAG received three 25-minute treatments per week for 6 weeks. The control group continued with their normal training activity and received no treatment. The maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) of the ankle plantar-flexors at 30° per second was measured using Biodex system 3. Results Both MA and EA had a positive effect in increasing plantar flexion strength. The likelihood for this happening was high; 69% for MA and 92% for EA when compared with the control group. However the effect size was small for both groups. There was only a trivial difference in the effect size between the EAG and the MAG in regards to average plantar flexion torque. Conclusion EA and MA have a beneficial effect on plantar flexion muscle strength compared with the control group in healthy population.en
dc.publisherSpringeren
dc.relation.urlhttp://link.springer.com/10.1007/s11726-017-0974-2en
dc.rightsSubject to 12 month embargo author can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing). For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/issn/1672-3597/ [Accessed: 09/03/2017]en
dc.titleThe effect of manual acupuncture and electroacupuncture on lower limb muscle strength-
dc.title.alternative手捻针和电针对下肢肌力的影响en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentTeesside University, School of Social Science Business and Lawen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Acupuncture and Tuina Scienceen
or.citation.harvardPayton, S., Bailey, S. D. (2017) 'The effect of manual acupuncture and electroacupuncture on lower limb muscle strength' Journal of Acupuncture and Tuina Science; 15 (1):47en
dc.embargo12 monthsen
dc.date.accepted2016-03-09-
All Items in TeesRep are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.