Inter-individual differences in weight change following exercise interventions: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/621672
Title:
Inter-individual differences in weight change following exercise interventions: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials
Other Titles:
Individual Variance in Weight Loss Response: A Systematic Review
Authors:
Williamson, P. J. (Philip); Atkinson, G. (Greg); Batterham, A. M. (Alan)
Affiliation:
Teesside University. School of Health and Social Care
Citation:
Williamson, P. J., Atkinson, G., Batterham, A. M. (2018) 'Inter-individual differences in weight change following exercise interventions: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials' Obesity Reviews; Accepted for publication: 9 Feb 2019
Publisher:
Wiley
Journal:
Obesity Reviews
Issue Date:
2018
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/621672
Abstract:
Previous reports of substantial inter-individual differences in weight change following an exercise intervention are often based solely on the observed responses in the intervention group. Therefore, we aimed to quantify the magnitude of inter-individual differences in exercise-mediated weight change. We synthesized randomised controlled trials (RCT) of structured, supervised exercise interventions. Fourteen electronic databases were searched for relevant studies published up to March 2017. Search terms focused on structured training, RCTs and body weight. We then sifted these results for those RCTs (n=12, 1500 participants) that included relevant comparator group data. Standard deviations (SD) of weight change were extracted, thereby allowing the SD for true inter-individual differences in weight-loss to be calculated for each study. Using a random effects meta-analysis, the pooled SD (95% CI) for true individual responses was 0.8 (-0.9 to 1.4) kg. The 95% prediction interval (based on 2SDs) for true inter-individual responses was -2.8 to 3.6 kg. The probability (% chance) that the true individual response variability would be clinically meaningful (>2.5 kg) in a future study in similar settings was 23% (‘unlikely’). Therefore, we conclude that evidence is limited for the notion that there are clinically important individual differences in exercise-mediated weight change.
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Keywords:
Inter-individual variation; weight loss; exercise; RCT; systematic review; meta-analysis
Rights:
Author can archive pre-print (ie pre-refereeing)

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorWilliamson, P. J. (Philip)en
dc.contributor.authorAtkinson, G. (Greg)en
dc.contributor.authorBatterham, A. M. (Alan)en
dc.date.accessioned2018-02-19T15:42:48Z-
dc.date.available2018-02-19T15:42:48Z-
dc.date.issued2018-
dc.identifier.citationObesity Reviews; Accepted for publication: 9 Feb 2018en
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10149/621672-
dc.description.abstractPrevious reports of substantial inter-individual differences in weight change following an exercise intervention are often based solely on the observed responses in the intervention group. Therefore, we aimed to quantify the magnitude of inter-individual differences in exercise-mediated weight change. We synthesized randomised controlled trials (RCT) of structured, supervised exercise interventions. Fourteen electronic databases were searched for relevant studies published up to March 2017. Search terms focused on structured training, RCTs and body weight. We then sifted these results for those RCTs (n=12, 1500 participants) that included relevant comparator group data. Standard deviations (SD) of weight change were extracted, thereby allowing the SD for true inter-individual differences in weight-loss to be calculated for each study. Using a random effects meta-analysis, the pooled SD (95% CI) for true individual responses was 0.8 (-0.9 to 1.4) kg. The 95% prediction interval (based on 2SDs) for true inter-individual responses was -2.8 to 3.6 kg. The probability (% chance) that the true individual response variability would be clinically meaningful (>2.5 kg) in a future study in similar settings was 23% (‘unlikely’). Therefore, we conclude that evidence is limited for the notion that there are clinically important individual differences in exercise-mediated weight change.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherWileyen
dc.rightsAuthor can archive pre-print (ie pre-refereeing)en
dc.subjectInter-individual variationen
dc.subjectweight lossen
dc.subjectexerciseen
dc.subjectRCTen
dc.subjectsystematic reviewen
dc.subjectmeta-analysisen
dc.titleInter-individual differences in weight change following exercise interventions: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trialsen
dc.title.alternativeIndividual Variance in Weight Loss Response: A Systematic Reviewen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentTeesside University. School of Health and Social Careen
dc.identifier.journalObesity Reviewsen
or.citation.harvardWilliamson, P. J., Atkinson, G., Batterham, A. M. (2018) 'Inter-individual differences in weight change following exercise interventions: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised controlled trials' Obesity Reviews; Accepted for publication: 9 Feb 2019en
dc.eprint.versionPost-print-
dc.embargo12 monthsen
dc.date.accepted2018-02-09-
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