Factors affecting self-referral to counselling services in the workplace: A qualitative study

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/92944
Title:
Factors affecting self-referral to counselling services in the workplace: A qualitative study
Authors:
Athanasiades, C. (Chrysostomos); Winthrop, A. (Allan); Gough, B. (Brendan)
Affiliation:
University of Teesside. School of Social Sciences and Law.
Citation:
Athanasiades, C., Winthrop, A. and Gough, B. (2008) 'Factors affecting self-referral to counselling services in the workplace: A qualitative study', British Journal of Guidance & Counselling, 36 (3), pp.257-276.
Publisher:
Taylor & Francis
Journal:
British Journal of Guidance & Counselling
Issue Date:
Aug-2008
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/92944
DOI:
10.1080/03069880802088937
Abstract:
The benefits of psychological support in the workplace (also known as workplace counselling) are well documented. Most large organisations in the UK have staff counselling schemes. However, it is unclear what, if any, factors affect employee decisions to use such schemes. This study has used a qualitative methodology to explore the reasons that make employees use workplace counselling. Eleven employees of a university in the north of England who had used the staff counselling service of their employer took part in the study. The employer had two schemes available: an internal staff counselling service and an external Employee Assistance Programme (EAP). A semi-structured interview was used with each participant and grounded theory techniques were used to analyse the interviews. The analysis resulted in the construction of a model of psychological help-seeking in the workplace. The main findings indicate that most participants were motivated to use their employer's counselling service by their prior positive experiences of similar or other type of mental health services. Other encouraging factors were: recommendation of service by others, a supportive environment and trust in the confidential ethos of the service. Conversely, negative preconceptions of psychological help-seeking and a perception of the employing environment as unsafe were shown to have been discouraging factors. The study concludes with suggestions for practice and for further research.
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Keywords:
employee assistance programme; EAP; employee wellbeing; grounded theory; psychological help-seeking; workplace counselling; self-referral
ISSN:
0306-9885
Rights:
Subject to restrictions, author can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing). For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ [Accessed 24/02/2010]
Citation Count:
1 [Scopus, 24/02/2010]

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorAthanasiades, C. (Chrysostomos)en
dc.contributor.authorWinthrop, A. (Allan)en
dc.contributor.authorGough, B. (Brendan)en
dc.date.accessioned2010-02-24T15:10:28Z-
dc.date.available2010-02-24T15:10:28Z-
dc.date.issued2008-08-
dc.identifier.citationBritish Journal of Guidance & Counselling; 36 (3): 257-276en
dc.identifier.issn0306-9885-
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/03069880802088937-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10149/92944-
dc.description.abstractThe benefits of psychological support in the workplace (also known as workplace counselling) are well documented. Most large organisations in the UK have staff counselling schemes. However, it is unclear what, if any, factors affect employee decisions to use such schemes. This study has used a qualitative methodology to explore the reasons that make employees use workplace counselling. Eleven employees of a university in the north of England who had used the staff counselling service of their employer took part in the study. The employer had two schemes available: an internal staff counselling service and an external Employee Assistance Programme (EAP). A semi-structured interview was used with each participant and grounded theory techniques were used to analyse the interviews. The analysis resulted in the construction of a model of psychological help-seeking in the workplace. The main findings indicate that most participants were motivated to use their employer's counselling service by their prior positive experiences of similar or other type of mental health services. Other encouraging factors were: recommendation of service by others, a supportive environment and trust in the confidential ethos of the service. Conversely, negative preconceptions of psychological help-seeking and a perception of the employing environment as unsafe were shown to have been discouraging factors. The study concludes with suggestions for practice and for further research.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherTaylor & Francisen
dc.rightsSubject to restrictions, author can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing). For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ [Accessed 24/02/2010]en
dc.subjectemployee assistance programmeen
dc.subjectEAPen
dc.subjectemployee wellbeingen
dc.subjectgrounded theoryen
dc.subjectpsychological help-seekingen
dc.subjectworkplace counsellingen
dc.subjectself-referralen
dc.titleFactors affecting self-referral to counselling services in the workplace: A qualitative studyen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Teesside. School of Social Sciences and Law.en
dc.identifier.journalBritish Journal of Guidance & Counsellingen
ref.citationcount1 [Scopus, 24/02/2010]en
or.citation.harvardAthanasiades, C., Winthrop, A. and Gough, B. (2008) 'Factors affecting self-referral to counselling services in the workplace: A qualitative study', British Journal of Guidance & Counselling, 36 (3), pp.257-276.-
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