Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/93493
Title:
Calling social work
Authors:
Coleman, N. (Nigel); Harris, J. (John)
Affiliation:
New College Durham. School of Education, Professional Development and Social Studies.
Citation:
Coleman, N. and Harris, J. (2008) 'Calling social work', British Journal of Social Work, 38 (3), pp.580-599.
Publisher:
Oxford University Press
Journal:
British Journal of Social Work
Issue Date:
Apr-2008
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/93493
DOI:
10.1093/bjsw/bcl371
Abstract:
New Labour has promoted the use of information and communication technology. Call centres are a key development in this strategy and are now in use for accessing social services. In official policy, the use of call centres is presented as an aspect of attempts to change the relationship between service users and the purchasers and providers of services. In contrast, we suggest that the use of call centres in social care does little to shift the balance of power. Call centres bring together four dimensions of New Labour discourse: learning from the private sector, cutting costs, technology and consumerism. Three issues emerge from their development: the undermining of social work's sense of place; the circumscribing of service user participation; the rationalization of social workers. The call centre serves as a signifier of what, it is claimed, the combination of New Labour's consumerism and technology can achieve. This signification disguises call centres' properties of efficiency, calculability, predictability and control. Contrary to the rhetoric that accompanies them, call centres may be curtailing service user participation, as well as delimiting the social work role. Accordingly, their use has important, but as yet largely unresearched, implications for service users and social workers.
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Keywords:
call centres; consumerism; cost-cutting; information and comunication technology; social work; private sector; social sevices
ISSN:
0045-3102; 1468-263X
Rights:
Subject to restrictions, author can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing). For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ [Accessed 03/03/2010]
Citation Count:
1 [Scopus, 03/03/2010]

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorColeman, N. (Nigel)en
dc.contributor.authorHarris, J. (John)en
dc.date.accessioned2010-03-03T09:20:34Z-
dc.date.available2010-03-03T09:20:34Z-
dc.date.issued2008-04-
dc.identifier.citationBritish Journal of Social Work; 38 (3): 580-599en
dc.identifier.issn0045-3102-
dc.identifier.issn1468-263X-
dc.identifier.doi10.1093/bjsw/bcl371-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10149/93493-
dc.description.abstractNew Labour has promoted the use of information and communication technology. Call centres are a key development in this strategy and are now in use for accessing social services. In official policy, the use of call centres is presented as an aspect of attempts to change the relationship between service users and the purchasers and providers of services. In contrast, we suggest that the use of call centres in social care does little to shift the balance of power. Call centres bring together four dimensions of New Labour discourse: learning from the private sector, cutting costs, technology and consumerism. Three issues emerge from their development: the undermining of social work's sense of place; the circumscribing of service user participation; the rationalization of social workers. The call centre serves as a signifier of what, it is claimed, the combination of New Labour's consumerism and technology can achieve. This signification disguises call centres' properties of efficiency, calculability, predictability and control. Contrary to the rhetoric that accompanies them, call centres may be curtailing service user participation, as well as delimiting the social work role. Accordingly, their use has important, but as yet largely unresearched, implications for service users and social workers.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherOxford University Pressen
dc.rightsSubject to restrictions, author can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing). For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ [Accessed 03/03/2010]en
dc.subjectcall centresen
dc.subjectconsumerismen
dc.subjectcost-cuttingen
dc.subjectinformation and comunication technologyen
dc.subjectsocial worken
dc.subjectprivate sectoren
dc.subjectsocial sevicesen
dc.titleCalling social worken
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentNew College Durham. School of Education, Professional Development and Social Studies.-
dc.identifier.journalBritish Journal of Social Worken
ref.citationcount1 [Scopus, 03/03/2010]en
or.citation.harvardColeman, N. and Harris, J. (2008) 'Calling social work', British Journal of Social Work, 38 (3), pp.580-599.-
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