The role of the photograph in the application of forensic anthropology and the interpretation of clandestine scenes of crime

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/93897
Title:
The role of the photograph in the application of forensic anthropology and the interpretation of clandestine scenes of crime
Authors:
Thompson, T. J. U. (Tim)
Citation:
Thompson, T. J. U. (2008) 'The role of the photograph in the application of forensic anthropology and the interpretation of clandestine scenes of crime', Photography and Culture, 1 (2), pp.163-182.
Publisher:
Berg Publishers
Journal:
Photography and Culture
Issue Date:
Nov-2008
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/93897
DOI:
10.2752/175145208X373752
Abstract:
Forensic anthropology is a very visual subject, demanding as it does the inspection and examination of the deceased human body for the purposes of assigning an identity. One important aspect of the visual nature of this subject is the use of photography for recording the physical features of the body and the context of any clandestine deposition. The use of photographs and images in forensic science is a wholly under-theorized topic; although it is fundamental to the practice of the subject, it is not discussed beyond the practical application at the crime scene or in the mortuary. However, issues such as image ownership, motivation of the photographer, the purpose of the photograph and the interpretation of the image all impact upon the ability of the forensic anthropologist to conduct his or her work, to situate the discipline within society and the world at large, and to provide a narrative of the context of death. This article will use case-study examples to discuss these issues within the framework of more general crime scene science, and consider how developments and uses here might impact on any application within forensic anthropology. It will explore how the photograph taken within the forensic anthropological arena is not the objective construction that forensic practitioners like to believe, but that it is influenced by, and in turn influences, the processes of human identification and the resolution of the context of death and disappearance.
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Keywords:
photography; forensic anthropology; crime scene; forensic science; war; media images
ISSN:
1751-4517; 1751-4525
Rights:
Subject to restrictions, author can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing). For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ [Accessed 08/03/2010]
Citation Count:
0 [Web of Science and Scopus, 08/03/2010]

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorThompson, T. J. U. (Tim)en
dc.date.accessioned2010-03-08T15:46:08Z-
dc.date.available2010-03-08T15:46:08Z-
dc.date.issued2008-11-
dc.identifier.citationPhotography and Culture; 1 (2): 163-182en
dc.identifier.issn1751-4517-
dc.identifier.issn1751-4525-
dc.identifier.doi10.2752/175145208X373752-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10149/93897-
dc.description.abstractForensic anthropology is a very visual subject, demanding as it does the inspection and examination of the deceased human body for the purposes of assigning an identity. One important aspect of the visual nature of this subject is the use of photography for recording the physical features of the body and the context of any clandestine deposition. The use of photographs and images in forensic science is a wholly under-theorized topic; although it is fundamental to the practice of the subject, it is not discussed beyond the practical application at the crime scene or in the mortuary. However, issues such as image ownership, motivation of the photographer, the purpose of the photograph and the interpretation of the image all impact upon the ability of the forensic anthropologist to conduct his or her work, to situate the discipline within society and the world at large, and to provide a narrative of the context of death. This article will use case-study examples to discuss these issues within the framework of more general crime scene science, and consider how developments and uses here might impact on any application within forensic anthropology. It will explore how the photograph taken within the forensic anthropological arena is not the objective construction that forensic practitioners like to believe, but that it is influenced by, and in turn influences, the processes of human identification and the resolution of the context of death and disappearance.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBerg Publishersen
dc.rightsSubject to restrictions, author can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing). For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ [Accessed 08/03/2010]en
dc.subjectphotographyen
dc.subjectforensic anthropologyen
dc.subjectcrime sceneen
dc.subjectforensic scienceen
dc.subjectwaren
dc.subjectmedia imagesen
dc.titleThe role of the photograph in the application of forensic anthropology and the interpretation of clandestine scenes of crimeen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalPhotography and Cultureen
ref.citationcount0 [Web of Science and Scopus, 08/03/2010]en
or.citation.harvardThompson, T. J. U. (2008) 'The role of the photograph in the application of forensic anthropology and the interpretation of clandestine scenes of crime', Photography and Culture, 1 (2), pp.163-182.-
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