Emotional reading of medical texts using conversational agents

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/93925
Title:
Emotional reading of medical texts using conversational agents
Book Title:
Proceedings of the seventh international conference on automonous agents and multiagnt systems, Vol. 3.
Authors:
Georg, G. (Gersende); Pelachaud, C. (Catherine); Cavazza, M. O. (Marc)
Editors:
Padgham, L. (Lin); Parkes, D. (David); Müller, J. P. (Jörg); Parsons, S. (Simon)
Affiliation:
University of Teesside
Citation:
Georg, G., Pelachaud, C. and Cavazza, M. O. (2008) 'Emotional reading of medical texts using conversational agents', The seventh international conference on autonomous agents and multiagent systems, Estoril, Portugal, May 12-16, in Padgham, L. et al. (eds) Proceedings of the seventh international conference on automonous agents and multiagnt systems, Vol. 3. International Foundation for Autonomous Agents and Multiagent Systems, pp.1285-1288.
Publisher:
International Foundation for Autonomous Agents and Multiagent Systems
Conference:
The seventh international conference on autonomous agents and multiagent systems, Estoril, Portugal, May 12-16 2008.
Issue Date:
2008
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/93925
Abstract:
In this paper, we present a prototype that helps visualizing the relative importance of sentences extracted from medical texts using Embodied Conversational Agents (ECA). We propose to map rhetorical structures automatically recognized in the documents onto a set of communicative acts controlling the expression of an ECA. As a consequence, the ECA will dramatize a sentence to reflect its perceived importance and rhetorical strength (advice, requirement, open proposal, etc). This prototype is constituted of three sub-systems: i) G-DEE, a text analysis module ii) a mapping module which converts rhetorical structures produced by the text analysis module into communicative functions driving the ECA animation and iii) an ECA system. By bringing the text to life, this system could help their authors (in our application, expert physicians) to reflect on the potential impact of the writing style they have adopted. The use of ECA reintroduces an affective element which cannot easily be captured by other methods for analyzing document's style.
Type:
Meetings and Proceedings; Book Chapter
Language:
en
Keywords:
document engineering; embodied conversational agents; markup languages; ECA; medical texts
ISBN:
978098173812X
Rights:
No publisher policy information on http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ [Accessed 09/03/2010]
Citation Count:
0 [Web of Science and Scopus, 09/03/2010]

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorGeorg, G. (Gersende)en
dc.contributor.authorPelachaud, C. (Catherine)en
dc.contributor.authorCavazza, M. O. (Marc)en
dc.contributor.editorPadgham, L. (Lin)en
dc.contributor.editorParkes, D. (David)en
dc.contributor.editorMüller, J. P. (Jörg)en
dc.contributor.editorParsons, S. (Simon)en
dc.date.accessioned2010-03-09T11:11:27Z-
dc.date.available2010-03-09T11:11:27Z-
dc.date.issued2008-
dc.identifier.isbn978098173812X-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10149/93925-
dc.description.abstractIn this paper, we present a prototype that helps visualizing the relative importance of sentences extracted from medical texts using Embodied Conversational Agents (ECA). We propose to map rhetorical structures automatically recognized in the documents onto a set of communicative acts controlling the expression of an ECA. As a consequence, the ECA will dramatize a sentence to reflect its perceived importance and rhetorical strength (advice, requirement, open proposal, etc). This prototype is constituted of three sub-systems: i) G-DEE, a text analysis module ii) a mapping module which converts rhetorical structures produced by the text analysis module into communicative functions driving the ECA animation and iii) an ECA system. By bringing the text to life, this system could help their authors (in our application, expert physicians) to reflect on the potential impact of the writing style they have adopted. The use of ECA reintroduces an affective element which cannot easily be captured by other methods for analyzing document's style.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherInternational Foundation for Autonomous Agents and Multiagent Systemsen
dc.rightsNo publisher policy information on http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ [Accessed 09/03/2010]en
dc.subjectdocument engineeringen
dc.subjectembodied conversational agentsen
dc.subjectmarkup languagesen
dc.subjectECAen
dc.subjectmedical textsen
dc.titleEmotional reading of medical texts using conversational agentsen
dc.typeMeetings and Proceedingsen
dc.typeBook Chapteren
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Teessideen
dc.title.bookProceedings of the seventh international conference on automonous agents and multiagnt systems, Vol. 3.en
dc.identifier.conferenceThe seventh international conference on autonomous agents and multiagent systems, Estoril, Portugal, May 12-16 2008.en
ref.citationcount0 [Web of Science and Scopus, 09/03/2010]en
or.citation.harvardGeorg, G., Pelachaud, C. and Cavazza, M. O. (2008) 'Emotional reading of medical texts using conversational agents', The seventh international conference on autonomous agents and multiagent systems, Estoril, Portugal, May 12-16, in Padgham, L. et al. (eds) Proceedings of the seventh international conference on automonous agents and multiagnt systems, Vol. 3. International Foundation for Autonomous Agents and Multiagent Systems, pp.1285-1288.-
prism.startingPage1285-
prism.endingPage1288-
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