Potential for reducing electricity demand for lighting in households: An exploratory socio-technical study

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/94333
Title:
Potential for reducing electricity demand for lighting in households: An exploratory socio-technical study
Authors:
Wall, R. (Rob); Crosbie, T. (Tracey)
Affiliation:
University of Teesside. School of Science and Technology. Centre for Construction Innovation and Research.
Citation:
Wall, R. and Crosbie, T. (2009) 'Potential for reducing electricity demand for lighting in households: An exploratory socio-technical study', Energy Policy, 37 (3), pp.1021-1031.
Publisher:
Elsevier
Journal:
Energy Policy
Issue Date:
Mar-2009
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/94333
DOI:
10.1016/j.enpol.2008.10.045
Abstract:
Illuminance data were collected from 18 UK dwellings during 1-week periods in spring 2007, to establish when luminaires were used and to calculate electricity consumption for lighting. Householders were also interviewed about lighting use and choices. The potential for reducing lighting electricity consumption by replacing incandescent bulbs with compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) is assessed. Mean weekly electricity consumption for lighting was 3.756 kW h and mean proportion of total electricity consumption used for lighting was 6.55%. It is notable, however, that participants generally expressed high levels of environmental awareness and that electricity consumption figures for less environmentally-aware households may differ. On average, households could have reduced lighting electricity consumption by 50.9% if all incandescent bulbs were replaced with CFLs. Even householders making extensive use of efficient lighting technologies expressed concerns about these technologies' performance, but seemed willing to tolerate perceived shortcomings for environmental reasons. However, the study raises questions about whether people without strong environmental motivations can be convinced that efficient lighting technologies will meet their needs. It also raises questions about the effectiveness of policies phasing out general lighting service incandescent bulbs, as there is a risk that householders may switch to tungsten halogen bulbs rather than low-energy options.
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Keywords:
electricity; household; lighting; consumption; environment
ISSN:
0301-4215
Rights:
Author can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing). For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ [Accessed 16/03/2010]
Citation Count:
1 [Scopus, 16/03/2010]

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorWall, R. (Rob)en
dc.contributor.authorCrosbie, T. (Tracey)en
dc.date.accessioned2010-03-16T11:32:02Z-
dc.date.available2010-03-16T11:32:02Z-
dc.date.issued2009-03-
dc.identifier.citationEnergy Policy; 37 (3): 1021-1031en
dc.identifier.issn0301-4215-
dc.identifier.doi10.1016/j.enpol.2008.10.045-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10149/94333-
dc.description.abstractIlluminance data were collected from 18 UK dwellings during 1-week periods in spring 2007, to establish when luminaires were used and to calculate electricity consumption for lighting. Householders were also interviewed about lighting use and choices. The potential for reducing lighting electricity consumption by replacing incandescent bulbs with compact fluorescent lamps (CFLs) is assessed. Mean weekly electricity consumption for lighting was 3.756 kW h and mean proportion of total electricity consumption used for lighting was 6.55%. It is notable, however, that participants generally expressed high levels of environmental awareness and that electricity consumption figures for less environmentally-aware households may differ. On average, households could have reduced lighting electricity consumption by 50.9% if all incandescent bulbs were replaced with CFLs. Even householders making extensive use of efficient lighting technologies expressed concerns about these technologies' performance, but seemed willing to tolerate perceived shortcomings for environmental reasons. However, the study raises questions about whether people without strong environmental motivations can be convinced that efficient lighting technologies will meet their needs. It also raises questions about the effectiveness of policies phasing out general lighting service incandescent bulbs, as there is a risk that householders may switch to tungsten halogen bulbs rather than low-energy options.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherElsevieren
dc.rightsAuthor can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing). For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ [Accessed 16/03/2010]en
dc.subjectelectricityen
dc.subjecthouseholden
dc.subjectlightingen
dc.subjectconsumptionen
dc.subjectenvironmenten
dc.titlePotential for reducing electricity demand for lighting in households: An exploratory socio-technical studyen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Teesside. School of Science and Technology. Centre for Construction Innovation and Research.en
dc.identifier.journalEnergy Policyen
ref.citationcount1 [Scopus, 16/03/2010]en
or.citation.harvardWall, R. and Crosbie, T. (2009) 'Potential for reducing electricity demand for lighting in households: An exploratory socio-technical study', Energy Policy, 37 (3), pp.1021-1031.-
All Items in TeesRep are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.