Investigating the 'rigid persistence paradox' in professional rugby union football

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/94489
Title:
Investigating the 'rigid persistence paradox' in professional rugby union football
Authors:
Sheard, M. (Michael); Golby, J. (Jim)
Affiliation:
University of Teesside
Citation:
Sheard, M. and Golby, J. (2009) 'Investigating the 'rigid persistence paradox' in professional rugby union football', International Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology, 7 (1), pp.101-114.
Publisher:
Fitness Information Technology
Journal:
International Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology
Issue Date:
Mar-2009
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/94489
Abstract:
This study sought to extend the findings of Amiot, Vallerand, and Blanchard (2006), which recently provided evidence of the "rigid persistence paradox" in high-achieving sport performers. The paradox amounts to athletes adjusting more easily to the demands of highly competitive sport if they rate highly in obsessive passion, a type of passion characterized as an internal pressure that compels the individual to engage in the passionate activity. The activity controls the person, resulting in an increased risk of experiencing conflict and increased negative affect. Yet, despite this, Amiot et al.'s findings suggest that obsessively passionate athletes adjust to the most competitive environments. The present study examined the levels of harmony and obsession of passion in the high-impact collision sport of rugby union football. Participants were 78 rugby union footballers representing three playing levels of the professional game in Great Britain (International, Club, and Academy). Results indicated that performers playing at the International and Academy standards scored significantly higher in obsessive passion than Club players, as measured by the Passion Scale. However, obsessive passion was not correlated with negative emotional outcomes, as measured by the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule. These findings provide partial supportive evidence of the existence of the rigid persistence paradox. Results are discussed in terms of the acceptance of the dedication and hours of deliberate practice needed to: a) compete at International level and b) become a professional sportsperson. Implications for sports performers and coaches, and future research suggestions, are discussed.
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Keywords:
rigid persistence paradox; obsessive; affect; rugby union football; playing standard; positive psychology; harmonious; passion
ISSN:
1612-197X
Rights:
Author can archive publisher's version/PDF. [Email from Fitness Information Technology editors]
Citation Count:
0 [Web of Science and Scopus, 18/03/2010]

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorSheard, M. (Michael)en
dc.contributor.authorGolby, J. (Jim)en
dc.date.accessioned2010-03-18T13:50:30Z-
dc.date.available2010-03-18T13:50:30Z-
dc.date.issued2009-03-
dc.identifier.citationInternational Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology; 7 (1): 101-114en
dc.identifier.issn1612-197X-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10149/94489-
dc.description.abstractThis study sought to extend the findings of Amiot, Vallerand, and Blanchard (2006), which recently provided evidence of the "rigid persistence paradox" in high-achieving sport performers. The paradox amounts to athletes adjusting more easily to the demands of highly competitive sport if they rate highly in obsessive passion, a type of passion characterized as an internal pressure that compels the individual to engage in the passionate activity. The activity controls the person, resulting in an increased risk of experiencing conflict and increased negative affect. Yet, despite this, Amiot et al.'s findings suggest that obsessively passionate athletes adjust to the most competitive environments. The present study examined the levels of harmony and obsession of passion in the high-impact collision sport of rugby union football. Participants were 78 rugby union footballers representing three playing levels of the professional game in Great Britain (International, Club, and Academy). Results indicated that performers playing at the International and Academy standards scored significantly higher in obsessive passion than Club players, as measured by the Passion Scale. However, obsessive passion was not correlated with negative emotional outcomes, as measured by the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule. These findings provide partial supportive evidence of the existence of the rigid persistence paradox. Results are discussed in terms of the acceptance of the dedication and hours of deliberate practice needed to: a) compete at International level and b) become a professional sportsperson. Implications for sports performers and coaches, and future research suggestions, are discussed.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherFitness Information Technologyen
dc.rightsAuthor can archive publisher's version/PDF. [Email from Fitness Information Technology editors]en
dc.subjectrigid persistence paradoxen
dc.subjectobsessiveen
dc.subjectaffecten
dc.subjectrugby union footballen
dc.subjectplaying standarden
dc.subjectpositive psychologyen
dc.subjectharmoniousen
dc.subjectpassionen
dc.titleInvestigating the 'rigid persistence paradox' in professional rugby union footballen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Teessideen
dc.identifier.journalInternational Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychologyen
ref.citationcount0 [Web of Science and Scopus, 18/03/2010]en
or.citation.harvardSheard, M. and Golby, J. (2009) 'Investigating the 'rigid persistence paradox' in professional rugby union football', International Journal of Sport and Exercise Psychology, 7 (1), pp.101-114.-
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