Disconnected youth? social exclusion, the ‘underclass’ & economic marginality

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/94521
Title:
Disconnected youth? social exclusion, the ‘underclass’ & economic marginality
Authors:
MacDonald, R. (Robert)
Affiliation:
University of Teesside
Citation:
MacDonald, R. (2008) 'Disconnected youth? social exclusion, the ‘underclass’ & economic marginality', Social Work and Society, 6 (2), pp.236-248.
Publisher:
Social Work & Society
Journal:
Social Work and Society
Issue Date:
2008
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/94521
Additional Links:
http://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:0009-11-17005
Abstract:
Most young people in the UK make relatively ‘successful’, unproblematic transitions from school to work and adulthood. What do we call those that do not? Labels imply explanation, not just description. Terms with academic and policy currency tend to define such young people by something they are not or by their presumed social and economic distance and dislocation from ‘the rest’. How we might best describe, explain and label the experience and problem of so-called ‘socially excluded’, ‘disconnected youth’ is the focus of the paper. It draws upon extensive qualitative research with young adults growing up in some of Britain’s poorest neighbourhoods, looking particularly at their labour market transitions. Some of the problems and inaccuracies of underclass theory and orthodox conceptualisations of social exclusion are discussed in the light of empirical findings. Following CW Mills, the youthful biographies described are set in a wider panorama of social structure and economic opportunity, particularly the rapid de-industrialisation of the locality studied. Understanding these historical processes of socio-economic change leads to the conclusion that, in short hand, ‘the economically marginal’ is the best descriptive label of the research participants and ‘economic marginalisation’ is the best explanation of their condition.
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Keywords:
young people; transitions; work; adulthood; social exclusion
ISSN:
1613-8953
Rights:
Any party may pass on this Work by electronic means and make it available for download under the terms and conditions of the Digital Peer Publishing License. The text of the license may be accessed and retrieved via Internet at http://www.dipp.nrw.de/lizenzen/dppl/dppl/DPPL_v2_en_06-2004.html [Email from Social Work & Society Co-Ordinating Office, 10/06/2010]
Citation Count:
0 [Web of Science and Scopus, 18/03/2010]

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMacDonald, R. (Robert)en
dc.date.accessioned2010-03-18T15:52:16Z-
dc.date.available2010-03-18T15:52:16Z-
dc.date.issued2008-
dc.identifier.citationSocial Work and Society; 6 (2): 236-248en
dc.identifier.issn1613-8953-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10149/94521-
dc.description.abstractMost young people in the UK make relatively ‘successful’, unproblematic transitions from school to work and adulthood. What do we call those that do not? Labels imply explanation, not just description. Terms with academic and policy currency tend to define such young people by something they are not or by their presumed social and economic distance and dislocation from ‘the rest’. How we might best describe, explain and label the experience and problem of so-called ‘socially excluded’, ‘disconnected youth’ is the focus of the paper. It draws upon extensive qualitative research with young adults growing up in some of Britain’s poorest neighbourhoods, looking particularly at their labour market transitions. Some of the problems and inaccuracies of underclass theory and orthodox conceptualisations of social exclusion are discussed in the light of empirical findings. Following CW Mills, the youthful biographies described are set in a wider panorama of social structure and economic opportunity, particularly the rapid de-industrialisation of the locality studied. Understanding these historical processes of socio-economic change leads to the conclusion that, in short hand, ‘the economically marginal’ is the best descriptive label of the research participants and ‘economic marginalisation’ is the best explanation of their condition.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSocial Work & Societyen
dc.relation.urlhttp://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:0009-11-17005en
dc.rightsAny party may pass on this Work by electronic means and make it available for download under the terms and conditions of the Digital Peer Publishing License. The text of the license may be accessed and retrieved via Internet at http://www.dipp.nrw.de/lizenzen/dppl/dppl/DPPL_v2_en_06-2004.html [Email from Social Work & Society Co-Ordinating Office, 10/06/2010]en
dc.subjectyoung peopleen
dc.subjecttransitionsen
dc.subjectworken
dc.subjectadulthooden
dc.subjectsocial exclusionen
dc.titleDisconnected youth? social exclusion, the ‘underclass’ & economic marginalityen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Teessideen
dc.identifier.journalSocial Work and Societyen
ref.citationcount0 [Web of Science and Scopus, 18/03/2010]en
or.citation.harvardMacDonald, R. (2008) 'Disconnected youth? social exclusion, the ‘underclass’ & economic marginality', Social Work and Society, 6 (2), pp.236-248.-
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