The sex industry, human trafficking and the global prohibition regime: a cautionary tale from Greece

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/94533
Title:
The sex industry, human trafficking and the global prohibition regime: a cautionary tale from Greece
Authors:
Papanicolaou, G. (Georgios)
Affiliation:
University of Teesside. School of Social Sciences and Law.
Citation:
Papanicolaou, G. (2008) 'The sex industry, human trafficking and the global prohibition regime: a cautionary tale from Greece', Trends in Organized Crime, 11 (4), pp.379-409.
Publisher:
Springer New York
Journal:
Trends in Organized Crime
Issue Date:
Dec-2008
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/94533
DOI:
10.1007/s12117-008-9048-7
Abstract:
Using the concept of global prohibition regimes as an analytical point of departure, this article interrogates the development and results of the agitation campaign that relayed the new global prohibition regime against trafficking for sexual exploitation in Greece after 1995. In line with the international trend towards the issue of trafficking in the 1990s, the Greek campaign has been successful in shaping perceptions of the change in the Greek sex industry on the basis of an equation of prostitution, trafficking and transnational organized crime, and it also successfully capitalized on transnational supports to induce changes in legislation and public policy. However, a critical examination of the Greek situation suggests that there is a considerable discrepancy between the above conceptualisation and the knowledge of the issue emerging from the activities of criminal justice agencies. The examination of the general conditions of economic exploitation and social marginalization of migrants in Greece in the 1990s and after reveals significant homologies between the social organization of the sex industry and other sectors of the economy that have depended on migrant labour. This result underscores the nature of the idea of organized crime as an ideological construct acting as a diversion from more substantive paths of inquiry into the structures of national economy that bear upon the exploitation of sexual labour.
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Keywords:
Greece; sex trafficking; prostitution; exploitation; global prohibition regimes; illegal migration; informal economy
ISSN:
1084-4791; 1936-4830
Rights:
Author can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing). For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ [Accessed 19/03/2010]
Citation Count:
0 [Web of Science and Scopus, 19/03/2010]

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorPapanicolaou, G. (Georgios)en
dc.date.accessioned2010-03-19T09:58:20Z-
dc.date.available2010-03-19T09:58:20Z-
dc.date.issued2008-12-
dc.identifier.citationTrends in Organized Crime; 11 (4): 379-409en
dc.identifier.issn1084-4791-
dc.identifier.issn1936-4830-
dc.identifier.doi10.1007/s12117-008-9048-7-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10149/94533-
dc.description.abstractUsing the concept of global prohibition regimes as an analytical point of departure, this article interrogates the development and results of the agitation campaign that relayed the new global prohibition regime against trafficking for sexual exploitation in Greece after 1995. In line with the international trend towards the issue of trafficking in the 1990s, the Greek campaign has been successful in shaping perceptions of the change in the Greek sex industry on the basis of an equation of prostitution, trafficking and transnational organized crime, and it also successfully capitalized on transnational supports to induce changes in legislation and public policy. However, a critical examination of the Greek situation suggests that there is a considerable discrepancy between the above conceptualisation and the knowledge of the issue emerging from the activities of criminal justice agencies. The examination of the general conditions of economic exploitation and social marginalization of migrants in Greece in the 1990s and after reveals significant homologies between the social organization of the sex industry and other sectors of the economy that have depended on migrant labour. This result underscores the nature of the idea of organized crime as an ideological construct acting as a diversion from more substantive paths of inquiry into the structures of national economy that bear upon the exploitation of sexual labour.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSpringer New Yorken
dc.rightsAuthor can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing). For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ [Accessed 19/03/2010]en
dc.subjectGreeceen
dc.subjectsex traffickingen
dc.subjectprostitutionen
dc.subjectexploitationen
dc.subjectglobal prohibition regimesen
dc.subjectillegal migrationen
dc.subjectinformal economyen
dc.titleThe sex industry, human trafficking and the global prohibition regime: a cautionary tale from Greeceen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Teesside. School of Social Sciences and Law.en
dc.identifier.journalTrends in Organized Crimeen
ref.citationcount0 [Web of Science and Scopus, 19/03/2010]en
or.citation.harvardPapanicolaou, G. (2008) 'The sex industry, human trafficking and the global prohibition regime: a cautionary tale from Greece', Trends in Organized Crime, 11 (4), pp.379-409.-
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