Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/95229
Title:
Improving the impact resistance of masonry parapet walls
Authors:
Hobbs, B. E. (Brian); Gilbert, M. M. (Meg); Molyneaux, T. C. K. (Tom); Newton, P. (Peter); Beattie, G.; Burnett, S. (Steve)
Affiliation:
University of Teesside. School of Science and Technology.
Citation:
Hobbs, B. E. et al. (2009) 'Improving the impact resistance of masonry parapet walls', Proceedings of the Institution of Civil Engineers: Structures and Buildings, 162 (1), pp.57-67.
Publisher:
Thomas Telford Publishing
Journal:
Proceedings of the Institution of Civil Engineers: Structures and Buildings
Issue Date:
Jan-2009
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/95229
DOI:
10.1680/stbu.2009.162.1.57
Abstract:
In the UK and other countries roadside masonry parapet walls are commonplace. Such walls were, however, generally not designed from the outset to resist out-of-plane impact loadings from highway vehicles. The consequences of an impact can obviously be severe, particularly in the case of railway overbridges. Following a programme of experimental impact tests performed in the 1990s on unreinforced masonry walls, this paper describes an investigation of the performance of reinforced masonry walls, tested under carefully controlled conditions in the laboratory. A total of 17 tests were performed on unreinforced and reinforced walls. The reinforced walls incorporated either bed joint reinforcement or one of two different types of drilled-in reinforcement. Whereas the bed-joint reinforcement was found to be largely ineffectual, the drilled-in reinforcing systems were found to be capable of enhancing the ability of plain masonry walls to resist impacts, ensuring a ductile response to the applied transient loading. The effect of drilled-in reinforcement on the resistance of walls with low-strength mortar was found to be particularly dramatic, changing the response from that of penetration and disintegration of the masonry to ductile behaviour, with the integrity of the wall maintained and only minimal wall displacement.
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Keywords:
brickwork; masonry; bridges; dynamics; parapet walls
ISSN:
0965-0911; 1751-7702
Rights:
Subject to restrictions, author can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing). For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ [Accessed 30/03/2010]
Citation Count:
1 [Scopus, 30/03/2010]

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHobbs, B. E. (Brian)en
dc.contributor.authorGilbert, M. M. (Meg)en
dc.contributor.authorMolyneaux, T. C. K. (Tom)en
dc.contributor.authorNewton, P. (Peter)en
dc.contributor.authorBeattie, G.en
dc.contributor.authorBurnett, S. (Steve)en
dc.date.accessioned2010-03-30T11:08:40Z-
dc.date.available2010-03-30T11:08:40Z-
dc.date.issued2009-01-
dc.identifier.citationProceedings of the Institution of Civil Engineers: Structures and Buildings; 162 (1): 57-67en
dc.identifier.issn0965-0911-
dc.identifier.issn1751-7702-
dc.identifier.doi10.1680/stbu.2009.162.1.57-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10149/95229-
dc.description.abstractIn the UK and other countries roadside masonry parapet walls are commonplace. Such walls were, however, generally not designed from the outset to resist out-of-plane impact loadings from highway vehicles. The consequences of an impact can obviously be severe, particularly in the case of railway overbridges. Following a programme of experimental impact tests performed in the 1990s on unreinforced masonry walls, this paper describes an investigation of the performance of reinforced masonry walls, tested under carefully controlled conditions in the laboratory. A total of 17 tests were performed on unreinforced and reinforced walls. The reinforced walls incorporated either bed joint reinforcement or one of two different types of drilled-in reinforcement. Whereas the bed-joint reinforcement was found to be largely ineffectual, the drilled-in reinforcing systems were found to be capable of enhancing the ability of plain masonry walls to resist impacts, ensuring a ductile response to the applied transient loading. The effect of drilled-in reinforcement on the resistance of walls with low-strength mortar was found to be particularly dramatic, changing the response from that of penetration and disintegration of the masonry to ductile behaviour, with the integrity of the wall maintained and only minimal wall displacement.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherThomas Telford Publishingen
dc.rightsSubject to restrictions, author can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing). For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ [Accessed 30/03/2010]en
dc.subjectbrickworken
dc.subjectmasonryen
dc.subjectbridgesen
dc.subjectdynamicsen
dc.subjectparapet wallsen
dc.titleImproving the impact resistance of masonry parapet wallsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Teesside. School of Science and Technology.en
dc.identifier.journalProceedings of the Institution of Civil Engineers: Structures and Buildingsen
ref.citationcount1 [Scopus, 30/03/2010]en
or.citation.harvardHobbs, B. E. et al. (2009) 'Improving the impact resistance of masonry parapet walls', Proceedings of the Institution of Civil Engineers: Structures and Buildings, 162 (1), pp.57-67.-
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