A profile of the belief system and attitudes to end-of-life decisions of senior clinicians working in a National Health Service Hospital in the United Kingdom

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/95726
Title:
A profile of the belief system and attitudes to end-of-life decisions of senior clinicians working in a National Health Service Hospital in the United Kingdom
Authors:
Pugh, E. J. (Edwin); Song, R. (Robert); Whittaker, V. J. (Victoria); Blenkinsopp, J.
Affiliation:
University of Teesside. School of Health and Social Care.
Citation:
Pugh, E. J. et al. (2009) 'A profile of the belief system and attitudes to end-of-life decisions of senior clinicians working in a National Health Service Hospital in the United Kingdom', Palliative Medicine, 23 (2), pp.158-164.
Publisher:
SAGE Publications
Journal:
Palliative Medicine
Issue Date:
2009
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/95726
DOI:
10.1177/0269216308100248
Abstract:
There is evidence from outside the United Kingdom to show that physicians' religious beliefs influence their decision making at the end of life. This UK study explores the belief system of consultants, nurse key workers and specialist registrars and their attitudes to decisions which commonly must be taken when caring for individuals who are dying. All consultants (N = 119), nurse key workers (N = 36) and specialist registrars (N = 44) working in an acute hospital in the north-east of England were asked to complete a postal questionnaire. In all, 65% of consultants, 67% of nurse key workers and 41% of specialist registrars responded. Results showed that consultants' religion and belief systems differed from those of nurses and the population they served. Consultants and nurses had statistically significant differences in their attitudes to common end of life decisions with consultants more likely to continue hydration and not withdraw treatment. Nurses were more sympathetic to the idea of physician-assisted suicide for unbearable suffering. This study shows the variability in belief system and attitudes to end of life decision making both within and between clinical groups. This may have practical implications for the clinical care given and the place of care. The personal belief system of consultants was not shown to affect their overall attitudes to withdrawing life-sustaining treatment or physician-assisted suicide.
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Keywords:
attitudes; belief; clinicians; decisions; end of life; spirituality
ISSN:
0269-2163; 1477-030X
Rights:
Subject to restrictions, author can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing). For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ [Accessed 06/04/2010]
Citation Count:
0 [Scopus, 06/04/2010]

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorPugh, E. J. (Edwin)en
dc.contributor.authorSong, R. (Robert)en
dc.contributor.authorWhittaker, V. J. (Victoria)en
dc.contributor.authorBlenkinsopp, J.en
dc.date.accessioned2010-04-06T15:10:13Z-
dc.date.available2010-04-06T15:10:13Z-
dc.date.issued2009-
dc.identifier.citationPalliative Medicine; 23 (2): 158-164en
dc.identifier.issn0269-2163-
dc.identifier.issn1477-030X-
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/0269216308100248-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10149/95726-
dc.description.abstractThere is evidence from outside the United Kingdom to show that physicians' religious beliefs influence their decision making at the end of life. This UK study explores the belief system of consultants, nurse key workers and specialist registrars and their attitudes to decisions which commonly must be taken when caring for individuals who are dying. All consultants (N = 119), nurse key workers (N = 36) and specialist registrars (N = 44) working in an acute hospital in the north-east of England were asked to complete a postal questionnaire. In all, 65% of consultants, 67% of nurse key workers and 41% of specialist registrars responded. Results showed that consultants' religion and belief systems differed from those of nurses and the population they served. Consultants and nurses had statistically significant differences in their attitudes to common end of life decisions with consultants more likely to continue hydration and not withdraw treatment. Nurses were more sympathetic to the idea of physician-assisted suicide for unbearable suffering. This study shows the variability in belief system and attitudes to end of life decision making both within and between clinical groups. This may have practical implications for the clinical care given and the place of care. The personal belief system of consultants was not shown to affect their overall attitudes to withdrawing life-sustaining treatment or physician-assisted suicide.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSAGE Publicationsen
dc.rightsSubject to restrictions, author can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing). For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ [Accessed 06/04/2010]en
dc.subjectattitudesen
dc.subjectbeliefen
dc.subjectcliniciansen
dc.subjectdecisionsen
dc.subjectend of lifeen
dc.subjectspiritualityen
dc.titleA profile of the belief system and attitudes to end-of-life decisions of senior clinicians working in a National Health Service Hospital in the United Kingdomen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Teesside. School of Health and Social Care.en
dc.identifier.journalPalliative Medicineen
ref.citationcount0 [Scopus, 06/04/2010]en
or.citation.harvardPugh, E. J. et al. (2009) 'A profile of the belief system and attitudes to end-of-life decisions of senior clinicians working in a National Health Service Hospital in the United Kingdom', Palliative Medicine, 23 (2), pp.158-164.-
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