Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/96438
Title:
Branding: A generation gap?
Authors:
Harradine, R. (Rod); Ross, J. (Jill)
Affiliation:
University of Teesside
Citation:
Harradine, R. and Ross, J. (2007) 'Branding: A generation gap?', Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management, 11 (2), pp.189-200.
Publisher:
Emerald
Journal:
Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management
Issue Date:
2007
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/96438
DOI:
10.1108/13612020710751374
Abstract:
Purpose - The paper seeks to explore key differences in the perceptions of parents and children towards branding, examining differences and potential implications. Design/methodology/approach - This study was conducted over a six-month period utilising focus groups, a school census and a parental survey to determine attitudes towards branding and to compare/contrast the different views and perceptions. Findings - The study demonstrated a gap between the perceptions of parents and the actual brand awareness of their children. The research indicated that children tend to be brand aware at a younger age than their parents believe. Many parents assume that branding influences on their child come from outside the family, but this was contradicted by the children. The study indicated that children have a growing ability to receive information about brands and are able to use this knowledge to inform the growing influence that they exert in the buying process. Finally the study indicated that parents were concerned over the influence that branding can have. It is suggested that the growing sophistication of children in relation to branding issues results in them becoming much more brand-wise when making purchase choices. Research limitations/implications - The choice of methodology - a census of a specific school - minimised sampling limitations. The middle-class catchment area may have produced some bias, and this could be addressed by replicating the research in different schools to allow a broader comparison of the findings. Originality/value - The paper adds to existing knowledge and understanding of branding and purchase decision making with specific reference to contradictions between generations.
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Keywords:
brands; children; consumer behaviour; parents; perception
ISSN:
1361-2026
Rights:
Author can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing). For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ [Accessed 13/04/2010]
Citation Count:
0 [Scopus, 13/04/2010]

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorHarradine, R. (Rod)en
dc.contributor.authorRoss, J. (Jill)en
dc.date.accessioned2010-04-13T15:15:17Z-
dc.date.available2010-04-13T15:15:17Z-
dc.date.issued2007-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Fashion Marketing and Management; 11 (2): 189-200en
dc.identifier.issn1361-2026-
dc.identifier.doi10.1108/13612020710751374-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10149/96438-
dc.description.abstractPurpose - The paper seeks to explore key differences in the perceptions of parents and children towards branding, examining differences and potential implications. Design/methodology/approach - This study was conducted over a six-month period utilising focus groups, a school census and a parental survey to determine attitudes towards branding and to compare/contrast the different views and perceptions. Findings - The study demonstrated a gap between the perceptions of parents and the actual brand awareness of their children. The research indicated that children tend to be brand aware at a younger age than their parents believe. Many parents assume that branding influences on their child come from outside the family, but this was contradicted by the children. The study indicated that children have a growing ability to receive information about brands and are able to use this knowledge to inform the growing influence that they exert in the buying process. Finally the study indicated that parents were concerned over the influence that branding can have. It is suggested that the growing sophistication of children in relation to branding issues results in them becoming much more brand-wise when making purchase choices. Research limitations/implications - The choice of methodology - a census of a specific school - minimised sampling limitations. The middle-class catchment area may have produced some bias, and this could be addressed by replicating the research in different schools to allow a broader comparison of the findings. Originality/value - The paper adds to existing knowledge and understanding of branding and purchase decision making with specific reference to contradictions between generations.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherEmeralden
dc.rightsAuthor can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing). For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ [Accessed 13/04/2010]en
dc.subjectbrandsen
dc.subjectchildrenen
dc.subjectconsumer behaviouren
dc.subjectparentsen
dc.subjectperceptionen
dc.titleBranding: A generation gap?en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Teessideen
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Fashion Marketing and Managementen
ref.citationcount0 [Scopus, 13/04/2010]en
or.citation.harvardHarradine, R. and Ross, J. (2007) 'Branding: A generation gap?', Journal of Fashion Marketing and Management, 11 (2), pp.189-200.-
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