The impact of James I's accession on the North-East of England

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/96507
Title:
The impact of James I's accession on the North-East of England
Authors:
Newton, D. (Diana)
Affiliation:
University of Teesside
Citation:
Newton, D. (2004) 'The impact of James I's accession on the North-East of England', 1603: The historical and cultural consequences of the accession of James I', University of Hull, June 27-28, 2003, Renaissance Forum; 7
Publisher:
University of Hull
Journal:
Renaissance Forum
Conference:
1603: The historical and cultural consequences of the accession of James I', University of Hull, June 27-28, 2003
Issue Date:
2004
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/96507
Additional Links:
http://www.hull.ac.uk/renforum/current.htm
Abstract:
In the final, long, drawn-out days of Elizabeth I's life, Sir John Carey, the deputy governor of the garrison town of Berwick upon Tweed , appealed urgently to Sir Robert Cecil. 'What should I do here,' he demanded, 'not knowing how or for whom to keep this place, being only in the devil's mouth, a place that will be first assailed, and I not being instructed what course to hold' (Salisbury 1902-65, vol. 12, 677). 1 These were indeed perilous times. With no heir to the English throne formally nominated, he was terrified that he would be an early victim should the Scottish King James VI attempt to take England by force on the death of the aged and ailing Queen. He was not alone in his unease, for King James himself was conscious that his forces should be in readiness should he need to defend his interest and he had said as much in letters to his English correspondents. Meanwhile, rumours were circulating throughout Europe. 2 But Sir John Carey, not a native Northumbrian, was also articulating contemporary estimations about the character of the north-east of England; as remote from central government, ignorant, fiendish, volatile and extremely vulnerable.
Type:
Article; Meetings and Proceedings
Language:
en
Keywords:
James I; accession; impact; north east England
ISSN:
1362-1149
Rights:
Copyright remains with the author. Material that has appeared in Renaissance Forum may be republished by the author in any form provided that Renaissance Forum is acknowledged as the original place of publication. For full details see http://www.hull.ac.uk/renforum/cpyrght.htm [Accessed 14/04/2010]
Citation Count:
0 [Web of Science and Scopus, 14/04/2010]

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorNewton, D. (Diana)en
dc.date.accessioned2010-04-14T10:37:09Z-
dc.date.available2010-04-14T10:37:09Z-
dc.date.issued2004-
dc.identifier.citationRenaissance Forum; 7en
dc.identifier.issn1362-1149-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10149/96507-
dc.description.abstractIn the final, long, drawn-out days of Elizabeth I's life, Sir John Carey, the deputy governor of the garrison town of Berwick upon Tweed , appealed urgently to Sir Robert Cecil. 'What should I do here,' he demanded, 'not knowing how or for whom to keep this place, being only in the devil's mouth, a place that will be first assailed, and I not being instructed what course to hold' (Salisbury 1902-65, vol. 12, 677). 1 These were indeed perilous times. With no heir to the English throne formally nominated, he was terrified that he would be an early victim should the Scottish King James VI attempt to take England by force on the death of the aged and ailing Queen. He was not alone in his unease, for King James himself was conscious that his forces should be in readiness should he need to defend his interest and he had said as much in letters to his English correspondents. Meanwhile, rumours were circulating throughout Europe. 2 But Sir John Carey, not a native Northumbrian, was also articulating contemporary estimations about the character of the north-east of England; as remote from central government, ignorant, fiendish, volatile and extremely vulnerable.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherUniversity of Hullen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.hull.ac.uk/renforum/current.htmen
dc.rightsCopyright remains with the author. Material that has appeared in Renaissance Forum may be republished by the author in any form provided that Renaissance Forum is acknowledged as the original place of publication. For full details see http://www.hull.ac.uk/renforum/cpyrght.htm [Accessed 14/04/2010]en
dc.subjectJames Ien
dc.subjectaccessionen
dc.subjectimpacten
dc.subjectnorth east Englanden
dc.titleThe impact of James I's accession on the North-East of Englanden
dc.typeArticleen
dc.typeMeetings and Proceedingsen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Teessideen
dc.identifier.journalRenaissance Forumen
dc.identifier.conference1603: The historical and cultural consequences of the accession of James I', University of Hull, June 27-28, 2003en
ref.citationcount0 [Web of Science and Scopus, 14/04/2010]en
or.citation.harvardNewton, D. (2004) 'The impact of James I's accession on the North-East of England', 1603: The historical and cultural consequences of the accession of James I', University of Hull, June 27-28, 2003, Renaissance Forum; 7-
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