Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/96599
Title:
The gendered carnival of pop
Authors:
Railton, D. (Diane)
Affiliation:
University of Teesside
Citation:
Railton, D. (2001) 'The gendered carnival of pop', Popular Music, 20 (3), pp.321-331.
Publisher:
Cambridge University Press
Journal:
Popular Music
Issue Date:
Oct-2001
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/96599
DOI:
10.1017/S0261143001001520
Abstract:
One of the ironies of popular music studies is that the music that is the most popular, in terms of contemporary chart success, is rarely discussed by academics writing in the field. In this article I want to suggest that this is because some forms of ‘mainstream’ chart pop music, and the discourse of the magazines that promote this type of music, pose a threat to the certainties of both gender and genre that underpin ‘serious’ popular music. The music I am concerned with here is that provided by ‘boy bands’ like Boyzone, Westlife or Five, and ‘girl groups’ like The Spice Girls, Atomic Kitten or Precious, as well as mixed-sex groups such as Steps, SClub7 and Hear'Say, and singers such as Britney Spears and Billie – music that is the mainstay of magazines such as the UK publications Smash Hits, Top of the Pops and Live and Kicking. I shall argue that this music, and the way of enjoying music promoted by the magazines that support it, can best be understood in terms of a carnivalesque disruption that challenges all stable ideas about what makes music good, and what popular music should be about. Furthermore, I shall argue that, just as this music is perhaps the only form of popular music to have a predominantly female audience, the threat that it poses is the threat of the feminine, and of female encroachment into what is still predominantly a male, and masculine, world.
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Keywords:
popular music; gendered; audience; promotions; magazines
ISSN:
0261-1430; 1474-0095
Rights:
Subject to restrictions, author can archive publisher's version/PDF. For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ Accessed 14/04/2010]
Citation Count:
1 [Scopus, 14/04/2010]

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorRailton, D. (Diane)en
dc.date.accessioned2010-04-15T13:17:42Z-
dc.date.available2010-04-15T13:17:42Z-
dc.date.issued2001-10-
dc.identifier.citationPopular Music; 20 (3): 321-331en
dc.identifier.issn0261-1430-
dc.identifier.issn1474-0095-
dc.identifier.doi10.1017/S0261143001001520-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10149/96599-
dc.description.abstractOne of the ironies of popular music studies is that the music that is the most popular, in terms of contemporary chart success, is rarely discussed by academics writing in the field. In this article I want to suggest that this is because some forms of ‘mainstream’ chart pop music, and the discourse of the magazines that promote this type of music, pose a threat to the certainties of both gender and genre that underpin ‘serious’ popular music. The music I am concerned with here is that provided by ‘boy bands’ like Boyzone, Westlife or Five, and ‘girl groups’ like The Spice Girls, Atomic Kitten or Precious, as well as mixed-sex groups such as Steps, SClub7 and Hear'Say, and singers such as Britney Spears and Billie – music that is the mainstay of magazines such as the UK publications Smash Hits, Top of the Pops and Live and Kicking. I shall argue that this music, and the way of enjoying music promoted by the magazines that support it, can best be understood in terms of a carnivalesque disruption that challenges all stable ideas about what makes music good, and what popular music should be about. Furthermore, I shall argue that, just as this music is perhaps the only form of popular music to have a predominantly female audience, the threat that it poses is the threat of the feminine, and of female encroachment into what is still predominantly a male, and masculine, world.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherCambridge University Pressen
dc.rightsSubject to restrictions, author can archive publisher's version/PDF. For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ Accessed 14/04/2010]en
dc.subjectpopular musicen
dc.subjectgendereden
dc.subjectaudienceen
dc.subjectpromotionsen
dc.subjectmagazinesen
dc.titleThe gendered carnival of popen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Teessideen
dc.identifier.journalPopular Musicen
ref.citationcount1 [Scopus, 14/04/2010]en
or.citation.harvardRailton, D. (2001) 'The gendered carnival of pop', Popular Music, 20 (3), pp.321-331.-
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