Teaching autonomy: ‘Reading groups’ and the development of autonomous learning practices

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/96613
Title:
Teaching autonomy: ‘Reading groups’ and the development of autonomous learning practices
Authors:
Railton, D. (Diane); Watson, P. (Paul)
Affiliation:
University of Teesside
Citation:
Railton, D. and Watson, P. (2005) 'Teaching autonomy: ‘Reading groups’ and the development of autonomous learning practices', Active Learning in Higher Education, 6 (3), pp.182-193.
Publisher:
SAGE Publications
Journal:
Active Learning in Higher Education
Issue Date:
Nov-2005
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/96613
DOI:
10.1177/1469787405057665
Abstract:
A key factor in the transition to university is the enculturation of new students into both the discipline they are studying and effective study practices. Most significantly, students, whatever their chosen discipline, must learn to become autonomous learners. Too often this process is either left to chance or seen as a natural attribute of the higher education learning system rather than a particular skill that must be learnt and can be taught. In this article we discuss one particular approach to designing ‘structured autonomy’ into a first year core media studies module. We argue that the notion of autonomy needs to be considered as a central component of learning, teaching and assessment strategies and, moreover, that an integrated approach towards these factors has the additional benefit of contributing towards a more holistic first year experience for students.
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Keywords:
university; autonomy; enculturation; first year experience; peer support; skills; transition
ISSN:
14697874
Rights:
Subject to restrictions, author can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing). For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ Accessed 14/04/2010]
Citation Count:
0 [Web of Science and Scopus, 14/04/2010]

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorRailton, D. (Diane)en
dc.contributor.authorWatson, P. (Paul)en
dc.date.accessioned2010-04-15T13:02:55Z-
dc.date.available2010-04-15T13:02:55Z-
dc.date.issued2005-11-
dc.identifier.citationActive Learning in Higher Education; 6 (3): 182-193en
dc.identifier.issn14697874-
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/1469787405057665-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10149/96613-
dc.description.abstractA key factor in the transition to university is the enculturation of new students into both the discipline they are studying and effective study practices. Most significantly, students, whatever their chosen discipline, must learn to become autonomous learners. Too often this process is either left to chance or seen as a natural attribute of the higher education learning system rather than a particular skill that must be learnt and can be taught. In this article we discuss one particular approach to designing ‘structured autonomy’ into a first year core media studies module. We argue that the notion of autonomy needs to be considered as a central component of learning, teaching and assessment strategies and, moreover, that an integrated approach towards these factors has the additional benefit of contributing towards a more holistic first year experience for students.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSAGE Publicationsen
dc.rightsSubject to restrictions, author can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing). For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ Accessed 14/04/2010]en
dc.subjectuniversityen
dc.subjectautonomyen
dc.subjectenculturationen
dc.subjectfirst year experienceen
dc.subjectpeer supporten
dc.subjectskillsen
dc.subjecttransitionen
dc.titleTeaching autonomy: ‘Reading groups’ and the development of autonomous learning practicesen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Teessideen
dc.identifier.journalActive Learning in Higher Educationen
ref.citationcount0 [Web of Science and Scopus, 14/04/2010]en
or.citation.harvardRailton, D. and Watson, P. (2005) 'Teaching autonomy: ‘Reading groups’ and the development of autonomous learning practices', Active Learning in Higher Education, 6 (3), pp.182-193.-
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