Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/96639
Title:
The ethnographic sublime
Authors:
Rampley, M. (Matthew)
Citation:
Rampley, M. (2005) 'The ethnographic sublime', RES: Anthropology and Aesthetics, 47, pp.251-263.
Publisher:
Peabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnology
Journal:
RES: Anthropology and Aesthetics
Issue Date:
2005
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/96639
Abstract:
In 1925 the soviet poet Vladimir Mayakovsky visited New York, and commented on the city as follows: "Lights go on all along the entire 25 mile long Broadway .... This is, the Americans say, the Great White Way. It really is white and one has the impression that it is brighter there at night than in the daytime .... The street-lamps, the dazzling lights of advertisements, the glow of shop windows and windows of the never- closing stores, the lights illuminating huge posters, lights from the open doors of cinemas and theatres, the speeding lights of automobiles and trolley cars, the lights of the subway trains glittering under one's feet through the glass pavements, the lights of inscriptions in the sky. The brightness, brightness, brightness..." Mayakovsky's paean to Manhatten and, in particular, to the electric cityscape is an exemplary instance of what David Nye has termed the American technological sublime. Nye's concern is primarily with the period between the late nineteenth century and the 1960's. Distinctive to this period is the way in which the experience of the sublime underwent a transference, from nature - obvious examples being, perhaps, Thoreau's Walden or Melville's Moby Dick - to the sociotechnical sphere. Hence, sublime astonishment was not merely found in natural phenomena such as the Grand Canyon or the Niagra Falls, but also in human constructions such as the Brooklyn Bridge, the Hoover Dam, or the Apollo Space Mission.
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Keywords:
Mayakovsky, Vladimir; New York; Manhattan; Nye, David; American technological sublime
ISSN:
0277-1322
Rights:
No publisher policy information on http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ [Accessed 16/04/2010]
Citation Count:
0 [Scopus, 16/04/2010]

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorRampley, M. (Matthew)en
dc.date.accessioned2010-04-16T10:49:24Z-
dc.date.available2010-04-16T10:49:24Z-
dc.date.issued2005-
dc.identifier.citationRES: Anthropology and Aesthetics; 47: 251-263en
dc.identifier.issn0277-1322-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10149/96639-
dc.description.abstractIn 1925 the soviet poet Vladimir Mayakovsky visited New York, and commented on the city as follows: "Lights go on all along the entire 25 mile long Broadway .... This is, the Americans say, the Great White Way. It really is white and one has the impression that it is brighter there at night than in the daytime .... The street-lamps, the dazzling lights of advertisements, the glow of shop windows and windows of the never- closing stores, the lights illuminating huge posters, lights from the open doors of cinemas and theatres, the speeding lights of automobiles and trolley cars, the lights of the subway trains glittering under one's feet through the glass pavements, the lights of inscriptions in the sky. The brightness, brightness, brightness..." Mayakovsky's paean to Manhatten and, in particular, to the electric cityscape is an exemplary instance of what David Nye has termed the American technological sublime. Nye's concern is primarily with the period between the late nineteenth century and the 1960's. Distinctive to this period is the way in which the experience of the sublime underwent a transference, from nature - obvious examples being, perhaps, Thoreau's Walden or Melville's Moby Dick - to the sociotechnical sphere. Hence, sublime astonishment was not merely found in natural phenomena such as the Grand Canyon or the Niagra Falls, but also in human constructions such as the Brooklyn Bridge, the Hoover Dam, or the Apollo Space Mission.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherPeabody Museum of Archaeology and Ethnologyen
dc.rightsNo publisher policy information on http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ [Accessed 16/04/2010]en
dc.subjectMayakovsky, Vladimiren
dc.subjectNew Yorken
dc.subjectManhattanen
dc.subjectNye, Daviden
dc.subjectAmerican technological sublimeen
dc.titleThe ethnographic sublimeen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.identifier.journalRES: Anthropology and Aestheticsen
ref.citationcount0 [Scopus, 16/04/2010]en
or.citation.harvardRampley, M. (2005) 'The ethnographic sublime', RES: Anthropology and Aesthetics, 47, pp.251-263.-
All Items in TeesRep are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.