Influence of continuous and interval training on oxygen uptake on-kinetics

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/96913
Title:
Influence of continuous and interval training on oxygen uptake on-kinetics
Authors:
Berger, N. J. A. (Nicolas); Tolfrey, K. (Keith); Williams, A. G.; Jones, A. M. (Andrew)
Affiliation:
Manchester Metropolitan University. Department of Exercise and Sport Science.
Citation:
Berger, N. J. A. et al. (2006) 'Influence of continuous and interval training on oxygen uptake on-kinetics', Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 38 (3), pp.504-512.
Publisher:
American College of Sports Medicine
Journal:
Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise
Issue Date:
Mar-2006
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/96913
DOI:
10.1249/01.mss.0000191418.37709.81
Abstract:
Purpose: To examine the relative effectiveness of moderate-intensity continuous training and high-intensity interval training on pulmonary O 2 uptake (V̇O2) kinetics at the onset of moderate- and severe-intensity cycle exercise in previously sedentary subjects. Methods: Twenty-three healthy subjects (11 males; mean ± SD age 24 ± 5 yr; V̇O2peak 34.3 ± 5.5 mL·kg-1-min -1) were assigned to one of three groups: a continuous training group that completed three to four sessions per week of 30-min duration at 60% V̇O2peak (LO); an interval training group that completed three to four sessions per week involving 20 × 1-min exercise bouts at 90% V̇O2peak separated by 1-min rest periods (HI); or a control group (CON). Before and after the 6-wk intervention period, all subjects completed a series of step exercise tests to moderate and severe work rates during which pulmonary V̇O2 was measured breath-by-breath. Results: ANOVA revealed that continuous and interval training were similarly effective in reducing the phase II V̇O2 time constant during moderate (LO: from 31 ± 8 to 23 ± 5 s; HI: from 32 ± 9 to 21 ± 4 s; both P < 0.05; CON: from 30 ± 6 to 29 ± 7 s; NSD) and severe exercise (LO: from 35 ± 6 to 24 ± 7 s; HI: from 32 ± 11 to 24 ± 7 s; both P < 0.05; CON: from 27 ± 7 to 25 ± 5 s; NSD) and in reducing the amplitude of the V̇O2 slow component (LO: from 0.38 ± 0.10 to 0.29 ± 0.09 L·min-1; HI: from 0.41 ± 0.28 to 0.30 ± 0.28 L·min-1; both P < 0.05; CON: from 0.54 ± 0.22 to 0.66 ± 0.38 L·min-1; NSD). Conclusions: Six weeks of low-intensity continuous training and high-intensity interval training were similarly effective in enhancing V̇O2 on-kinetics following step transitions to moderate and severe exercise in previously untrained subjects.
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Keywords:
cycle exercise; endurance; O2 dynamics; slow component; interval training; pulmonary O2 uptake
ISSN:
0195-9131
Rights:
Author can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing). For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ [Accessed 20/04/2010]
Citation Count:
15 [Scopus, 20/04/2010]

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBerger, N. J. A. (Nicolas)en
dc.contributor.authorTolfrey, K. (Keith)en
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, A. G.en
dc.contributor.authorJones, A. M. (Andrew)en
dc.date.accessioned2010-04-20T11:52:58Z-
dc.date.available2010-04-20T11:52:58Z-
dc.date.issued2006-03-
dc.identifier.citationMedicine & Science in Sports & Exercise; 38 (3): 504-512en
dc.identifier.issn0195-9131-
dc.identifier.doi10.1249/01.mss.0000191418.37709.81-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10149/96913-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: To examine the relative effectiveness of moderate-intensity continuous training and high-intensity interval training on pulmonary O 2 uptake (V̇O2) kinetics at the onset of moderate- and severe-intensity cycle exercise in previously sedentary subjects. Methods: Twenty-three healthy subjects (11 males; mean ± SD age 24 ± 5 yr; V̇O2peak 34.3 ± 5.5 mL·kg-1-min -1) were assigned to one of three groups: a continuous training group that completed three to four sessions per week of 30-min duration at 60% V̇O2peak (LO); an interval training group that completed three to four sessions per week involving 20 × 1-min exercise bouts at 90% V̇O2peak separated by 1-min rest periods (HI); or a control group (CON). Before and after the 6-wk intervention period, all subjects completed a series of step exercise tests to moderate and severe work rates during which pulmonary V̇O2 was measured breath-by-breath. Results: ANOVA revealed that continuous and interval training were similarly effective in reducing the phase II V̇O2 time constant during moderate (LO: from 31 ± 8 to 23 ± 5 s; HI: from 32 ± 9 to 21 ± 4 s; both P < 0.05; CON: from 30 ± 6 to 29 ± 7 s; NSD) and severe exercise (LO: from 35 ± 6 to 24 ± 7 s; HI: from 32 ± 11 to 24 ± 7 s; both P < 0.05; CON: from 27 ± 7 to 25 ± 5 s; NSD) and in reducing the amplitude of the V̇O2 slow component (LO: from 0.38 ± 0.10 to 0.29 ± 0.09 L·min-1; HI: from 0.41 ± 0.28 to 0.30 ± 0.28 L·min-1; both P < 0.05; CON: from 0.54 ± 0.22 to 0.66 ± 0.38 L·min-1; NSD). Conclusions: Six weeks of low-intensity continuous training and high-intensity interval training were similarly effective in enhancing V̇O2 on-kinetics following step transitions to moderate and severe exercise in previously untrained subjects.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherAmerican College of Sports Medicineen
dc.rightsAuthor can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing). For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ [Accessed 20/04/2010]en
dc.subjectcycle exerciseen
dc.subjectenduranceen
dc.subjectO2 dynamicsen
dc.subjectslow componenten
dc.subjectinterval trainingen
dc.subjectpulmonary O2 uptakeen
dc.titleInfluence of continuous and interval training on oxygen uptake on-kineticsen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentManchester Metropolitan University. Department of Exercise and Sport Science.en
dc.identifier.journalMedicine & Science in Sports & Exerciseen
ref.citationcount15 [Scopus, 20/04/2010]en
or.citation.harvardBerger, N. J. A. et al. (2006) 'Influence of continuous and interval training on oxygen uptake on-kinetics', Medicine & Science in Sports & Exercise, 38 (3), pp.504-512.-
All Items in TeesRep are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.