The nature of medical evidence and its inherent uncertainty for the clinical consultation: Qualitative study

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/96976
Title:
The nature of medical evidence and its inherent uncertainty for the clinical consultation: Qualitative study
Authors:
Griffiths, F. (Frances); Green, E. E. (Eileen); Tsouroufli, M. (Maria)
Affiliation:
University of Teesside.; Social Futures Institute. Unit for Social and Policy Research.
Citation:
Griffiths, F., Green, E. E. and Tsouroufli, M. (2005) 'The nature of medical evidence and its inheant uncertainty for the clinical consultation: Qualitative study', British Medical Journal, 330 (7490), pp.511-515.
Publisher:
BMJ Publishing Group
Journal:
British Medical Journal
Issue Date:
Mar-2005
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/96976
DOI:
10.1136/bmj.38336.482720.8F
Abstract:
Objective: To describe how clinicians deal with the uncertainty inherent in medical evidence in clinical consultations. Design: Qualitative study. Setting: Clinical consultations related to hormone replacement therapy, bone densitometry, and breast screening in seven general practices and three secondary care clinics in the UK NHS. Participants: Women aged 45-64. Results: 45 of the 109 relevant consultations included sufficient discussion for analysis. The consultations could be categorised into three groups: focus on certainty for now and this test, with slippage into general reassurance; a coherent account of the medical evidence for risks and benefits, but blurring of the uncertainty inherent in the evidence and giving an impression of certainty; and acknowledging the inherent uncertainty of the medical evidence and negotiating a provisional decision. Conclusion: Strategies health professionals use to cope with the uncertainty inherent in medical evidence in clinical consultations include the use of provisional decisions that allow for changing priorities and circumstances over time, to avoid slippage into general reassurance from a particular test result, and to avoid the creation of a myth of certainty.
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Keywords:
medical evidence; clinical consultation; hormone replacement therapy; bone densitometry; breast screening; uncertainty inherent
ISSN:
0959-8138; 1468-5833
Rights:
Author can archive publisher's version/PDF. For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ [Accessed 21/04/2010]
Citation Count:
33 [Scopus, 21/04/2010]

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorGriffiths, F. (Frances)en
dc.contributor.authorGreen, E. E. (Eileen)en
dc.contributor.authorTsouroufli, M. (Maria)en
dc.date.accessioned2010-04-21T09:20:55Z-
dc.date.available2010-04-21T09:20:55Z-
dc.date.issued2005-03-
dc.identifier.citationBritish Medical Journal; 330 (7490): 511-515en
dc.identifier.issn0959-8138-
dc.identifier.issn1468-5833-
dc.identifier.doi10.1136/bmj.38336.482720.8F-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10149/96976-
dc.description.abstractObjective: To describe how clinicians deal with the uncertainty inherent in medical evidence in clinical consultations. Design: Qualitative study. Setting: Clinical consultations related to hormone replacement therapy, bone densitometry, and breast screening in seven general practices and three secondary care clinics in the UK NHS. Participants: Women aged 45-64. Results: 45 of the 109 relevant consultations included sufficient discussion for analysis. The consultations could be categorised into three groups: focus on certainty for now and this test, with slippage into general reassurance; a coherent account of the medical evidence for risks and benefits, but blurring of the uncertainty inherent in the evidence and giving an impression of certainty; and acknowledging the inherent uncertainty of the medical evidence and negotiating a provisional decision. Conclusion: Strategies health professionals use to cope with the uncertainty inherent in medical evidence in clinical consultations include the use of provisional decisions that allow for changing priorities and circumstances over time, to avoid slippage into general reassurance from a particular test result, and to avoid the creation of a myth of certainty.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBMJ Publishing Groupen
dc.rightsAuthor can archive publisher's version/PDF. For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ [Accessed 21/04/2010]en
dc.subjectmedical evidenceen
dc.subjectclinical consultationen
dc.subjecthormone replacement therapyen
dc.subjectbone densitometryen
dc.subjectbreast screeningen
dc.subjectuncertainty inherenten
dc.titleThe nature of medical evidence and its inherent uncertainty for the clinical consultation: Qualitative studyen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Teesside.en
dc.contributor.departmentSocial Futures Institute. Unit for Social and Policy Research.en
dc.identifier.journalBritish Medical Journalen
ref.citationcount33 [Scopus, 21/04/2010]en
or.citation.harvardGriffiths, F., Green, E. E. and Tsouroufli, M. (2005) 'The nature of medical evidence and its inheant uncertainty for the clinical consultation: Qualitative study', British Medical Journal, 330 (7490), pp.511-515.en
All Items in TeesRep are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.