Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/97113
Title:
Disconnected Youth?
Authors:
MacDonald, R. (Robert); Marsh, J. (Jane)
Affiliation:
University of Teesside. School of Social Sciences.; Social Futures Institute. Youth Research Unit.
Citation:
MacDonald, R. and Marsh, J. (2001) 'Disconnected Youth?', Journal of Youth Studies, 4 (4), pp.373-391.
Publisher:
Taylor & Francis
Journal:
Journal of Youth Studies
Issue Date:
Dec-2001
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/97113
DOI:
10.1080/13676260120101860
Abstract:
Drawing on qualitative research on youth transitions in a locale that faces all the objective problems of 'social exclusion' in extreme form, this article explores the ways in which young people are connected to, or disconnected from, mainstream opportunities, lifestyles and outlooks. Case studies are used to uncover the lived experience of single motherhood, drug-related crime and persistent unemployment. These are examined to reveal how they connect, or do not connect, with prevailing academic and policy discourses about 'excluded', 'underclass' youth. We argue that the policy-driven social exclusion paradigm does have analytical advantages over underclass theory. They both fail, however, to capture the diversity of transitions that evolve in areas like this and the way that local networks and cultures can serve to include economically marginal youth. We conclude by questioning some of the basic assumptions of government social inclusion policies.
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Keywords:
youth transitions; qualitative research; social exclusion; single motherhood; drugs; crime; unemployment; social inclusion; government policies
ISSN:
1367-6261; 1469-9680
Rights:
Subject to restrictions, author can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing). For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ [Accessed 22/04/2010]
Citation Count:
0 [Web of Science and Scopus, 22/04/2010]

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMacDonald, R. (Robert)en
dc.contributor.authorMarsh, J. (Jane)en
dc.date.accessioned2010-04-22T08:14:08Z-
dc.date.available2010-04-22T08:14:08Z-
dc.date.issued2001-12-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Youth Studies; 4 (4): 373 - 391en
dc.identifier.issn1367-6261-
dc.identifier.issn1469-9680-
dc.identifier.doi10.1080/13676260120101860-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10149/97113-
dc.description.abstractDrawing on qualitative research on youth transitions in a locale that faces all the objective problems of 'social exclusion' in extreme form, this article explores the ways in which young people are connected to, or disconnected from, mainstream opportunities, lifestyles and outlooks. Case studies are used to uncover the lived experience of single motherhood, drug-related crime and persistent unemployment. These are examined to reveal how they connect, or do not connect, with prevailing academic and policy discourses about 'excluded', 'underclass' youth. We argue that the policy-driven social exclusion paradigm does have analytical advantages over underclass theory. They both fail, however, to capture the diversity of transitions that evolve in areas like this and the way that local networks and cultures can serve to include economically marginal youth. We conclude by questioning some of the basic assumptions of government social inclusion policies.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherTaylor & Francisen
dc.rightsSubject to restrictions, author can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing). For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ [Accessed 22/04/2010]en
dc.subjectyouth transitionsen
dc.subjectqualitative researchen
dc.subjectsocial exclusionen
dc.subjectsingle motherhooden
dc.subjectdrugsen
dc.subjectcrimeen
dc.subjectunemploymenten
dc.subjectsocial inclusionen
dc.subjectgovernment policiesen
dc.titleDisconnected Youth?en
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Teesside. School of Social Sciences.en
dc.contributor.departmentSocial Futures Institute. Youth Research Unit.en
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Youth Studiesen
ref.citationcount0 [Web of Science and Scopus, 22/04/2010]en
or.citation.harvardMacDonald, R. and Marsh, J. (2001) 'Disconnected Youth?', Journal of Youth Studies, 4 (4), pp.373-391.en
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