The white-coat effect: Physician attire and perceived authority, friendliness, and attractiveness

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/97174
Title:
The white-coat effect: Physician attire and perceived authority, friendliness, and attractiveness
Authors:
Brase, G. L. (Gary); Richmond, J. (Jill)
Affiliation:
University of Sunderland
Citation:
Brase, G. L. and Richmond, J. (2004) 'The white-coat effect: Physician attire and perceived authority, friendliness, and attractiveness', Journal of Applied Social Psychology, 34 (12), pp.2469-2481.
Publisher:
Wiley-Blackwell
Journal:
Journal of Applied Social Psychology
Issue Date:
Dec-2004
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10149/97174
DOI:
10.1111/j.1559-1816.2004.tb01987.x
Abstract:
Although previous studies have evaluated the effects of attire on doctor-patient inter-action, the common assumption of a tradeoff between perceptions of medical authority/status versus trustworthiness/openness has not been established. Thirty-eight male and 40 female participants rated their perceptions of same- and opposite-gender models who all were identified as doctors, but who were wearing different attire. The results indicate that authority and trust are not opposing factors and that a white coat and formal attire are clearly superior to casual attire. Additionally, perceptions of attractiveness of same- and opposite-gender doctors were rated, finding gender differences in perceptions different from, but theoretically similar to, prior findings. For females rating male models, perceptions of authority and attractiveness appear to be related.
Type:
Article
Language:
en
Keywords:
attire; doctor-patient interaction; white coat; perceptions; attractiveness; authority; friendliness
ISSN:
0021-9029; 1559-1816
Rights:
Subject to restrictions, author can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing). For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ [Accessed 22/04/2010]
Citation Count:
4 [Scopus, 22/04/2010]

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorBrase, G. L. (Gary)en
dc.contributor.authorRichmond, J. (Jill)en
dc.date.accessioned2010-04-22T14:03:22Z-
dc.date.available2010-04-22T14:03:22Z-
dc.date.issued2004-12-
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Applied Social Psychology; 34 (12): 2469-2481en
dc.identifier.issn0021-9029-
dc.identifier.issn1559-1816-
dc.identifier.doi10.1111/j.1559-1816.2004.tb01987.x-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10149/97174-
dc.description.abstractAlthough previous studies have evaluated the effects of attire on doctor-patient inter-action, the common assumption of a tradeoff between perceptions of medical authority/status versus trustworthiness/openness has not been established. Thirty-eight male and 40 female participants rated their perceptions of same- and opposite-gender models who all were identified as doctors, but who were wearing different attire. The results indicate that authority and trust are not opposing factors and that a white coat and formal attire are clearly superior to casual attire. Additionally, perceptions of attractiveness of same- and opposite-gender doctors were rated, finding gender differences in perceptions different from, but theoretically similar to, prior findings. For females rating male models, perceptions of authority and attractiveness appear to be related.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherWiley-Blackwellen
dc.rightsSubject to restrictions, author can archive post-print (ie final draft post-refereeing). For full details see http://www.sherpa.ac.uk/romeo/ [Accessed 22/04/2010]en
dc.subjectattireen
dc.subjectdoctor-patient interactionen
dc.subjectwhite coaten
dc.subjectperceptionsen
dc.subjectattractivenessen
dc.subjectauthorityen
dc.subjectfriendlinessen
dc.titleThe white-coat effect: Physician attire and perceived authority, friendliness, and attractivenessen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentUniversity of Sunderlanden
dc.identifier.journalJournal of Applied Social Psychologyen
ref.citationcount4 [Scopus, 22/04/2010]en
or.citation.harvardBrase, G. L. and Richmond, J. (2004) 'The white-coat effect: Physician attire and perceived authority, friendliness, and attractiveness', Journal of Applied Social Psychology, 34 (12), pp.2469-2481.-
All Items in TeesRep are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.